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@@ -1,5 +1,10
1 # EditorConfig configuration for netop:// ウエハ's projects
2 # http://editorconfig.org
3
4 # Top-most EditorConfig file
1 root = true
5 root = true
2
6
7 # Unix-style newlines with a newline ending every file, utf-8 charset
3 [*]
8 [*]
4 charset = utf-8
9 charset = utf-8
5 end_of_line = lf
10 end_of_line = lf
@@ -7,3 +12,10 indent_size = 2
7 indent_style = space
12 indent_style = space
8 insert_final_newline = true
13 insert_final_newline = true
9 trim_trailing_whitespace = true
14 trim_trailing_whitespace = true
15
16 [*.md]
17 trim_trailing_whitespace = false
18
19 # Match diffs, avoid to trim trailing whitespace
20 [*.{diff,patch}]
21 trim_trailing_whitespace = false
@@ -2,7 +2,7
2 <feed xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom">
2 <feed xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom">
3 <id>https://blog.webb.page/</id>
3 <id>https://blog.webb.page/</id>
4 <title>the Webb blog</title>
4 <title>the Webb blog</title>
5 <updated>2019-12-09T05:39:15.584Z</updated>
5 <updated>2019-12-13T05:23:57.130Z</updated>
6 <generator>The 'Net</generator>
6 <generator>The 'Net</generator>
7 <author>
7 <author>
8 <name>Paul Anthony Webb</name>
8 <name>Paul Anthony Webb</name>
@@ -54,7 +54,7
54 <p>Y&#39;know what would be nice? Having an easy way to share any files that you&#39;re hosting. Although, you may not want to expose your personal API server to the public. For this purpose, you could use a third-party site like <code>personal.sh</code> to generate shareable links (probably via <code>personal.sh/are</code>, I&#39;m a fan of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_hack" title="Explanation of &#39;Domain hack&#39; on Wikipedia">domain hacking</a>).</p>
54 <p>Y&#39;know what would be nice? Having an easy way to share any files that you&#39;re hosting. Although, you may not want to expose your personal API server to the public. For this purpose, you could use a third-party site like <code>personal.sh</code> to generate shareable links (probably via <code>personal.sh/are</code>, I&#39;m a fan of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_hack" title="Explanation of &#39;Domain hack&#39; on Wikipedia">domain hacking</a>).</p>
55 <p>Because the Internet is open to all, there will inevitably be disturbing/disgusting/morally-bankrupt content shared through <code>personal.sh</code>. If/when that happens, the offending user will have their IP address blacklisted and put on display at <code>personal.sh/it</code>. It&#39;s no secret that anonymity gives some people courage to behave in a way that&#39;s unbecoming.</p>
55 <p>Because the Internet is open to all, there will inevitably be disturbing/disgusting/morally-bankrupt content shared through <code>personal.sh</code>. If/when that happens, the offending user will have their IP address blacklisted and put on display at <code>personal.sh/it</code>. It&#39;s no secret that anonymity gives some people courage to behave in a way that&#39;s unbecoming.</p>
56 <h2 id="prior-art">Prior Art</h2>
56 <h2 id="prior-art">Prior Art</h2>
57 <p>There&#39;s a company named Urbit who&#39;s mission is quite similar:</p>
57 <p>There&#39;s a company named Urbit whose mission is quite similar:</p>
58 <blockquote>
58 <blockquote>
59 <p>An Urbit is a networked personal server that runs your apps and stores your data, serves as your permanent online identity and puts you back in control of your digital life under a single login.</p>
59 <p>An Urbit is a networked personal server that runs your apps and stores your data, serves as your permanent online identity and puts you back in control of your digital life under a single login.</p>
60 <p>When you’re ready.<br/>— <a href="https://twitter.com/urbitlive/status/1192262246384230400" title="&#39;urbit live&#39; account on Twitter">urbit live</a></p>
60 <p>When you’re ready.<br/>— <a href="https://twitter.com/urbitlive/status/1192262246384230400" title="&#39;urbit live&#39; account on Twitter">urbit live</a></p>
@@ -166,7 +166,7
166 <p>For people in the web/tech space, the aforementioned scenarios are quite common. Heck, I&#39;m quite sure they echo what happened <em>today</em> somewhere...and you witnessed it. A common thread that links the leadership mentioned (aside from the CTO) is apathy; a complete lack of empathy, social understanding/awareness, or just <em>care</em>. In the comment about my self analysis earlier, I linked a blog post where I realized I put my ego before the team I was hired to work with. I was, quite frankly, a jackass[4] and there&#39;s no room for one unless you work at a zoo. Self-reflection is a useful tool you should pull out every now and then and as you can probably tell, most people don&#39;t utilize it.</p>
166 <p>For people in the web/tech space, the aforementioned scenarios are quite common. Heck, I&#39;m quite sure they echo what happened <em>today</em> somewhere...and you witnessed it. A common thread that links the leadership mentioned (aside from the CTO) is apathy; a complete lack of empathy, social understanding/awareness, or just <em>care</em>. In the comment about my self analysis earlier, I linked a blog post where I realized I put my ego before the team I was hired to work with. I was, quite frankly, a jackass[4] and there&#39;s no room for one unless you work at a zoo. Self-reflection is a useful tool you should pull out every now and then and as you can probably tell, most people don&#39;t utilize it.</p>
167 <h3 id="software-is-hard-relationships-are-easy">Software is hard, relationships are easy</h3>
167 <h3 id="software-is-hard-relationships-are-easy">Software is hard, relationships are easy</h3>
168 <blockquote>
168 <blockquote>
169 <p>If you don&#39;t build your dream, someone will hire you to help build theirs.<br/>— Tony Gaskin</p>
169 <p>If you don&#39;t build your dream, someone will hire you to help build theirs.<br/>— Tony Gaskin</p>
170 </blockquote>
170 </blockquote>
171 <p>I reflect upon this quote often as I help people build their dreams (startups) while also building <a href="https://socii.network">my own</a>. I do believe there&#39;s been a sea change in the industry around employee happiness and retention. Have a look at job postings and you will see work satisfaction and happiness as a perk.</p>
171 <p>I reflect upon this quote often as I help people build their dreams (startups) while also building <a href="https://socii.network">my own</a>. I do believe there&#39;s been a sea change in the industry around employee happiness and retention. Have a look at job postings and you will see work satisfaction and happiness as a perk.</p>
172 <p>No one wants to work in a hostile environment and after a while, people realize they don&#39;t have to put up with bullshit and they quit (or are fired before they get the chance, lol). To echo the tone of Gaskin&#39;s quote but modified for business leadership:</p>
172 <p>No one wants to work in a hostile environment and after a while, people realize they don&#39;t have to put up with bullshit and they quit (or are fired before they get the chance, lol). To echo the tone of Gaskin&#39;s quote but modified for business leadership:</p>
@@ -2526,7 +2526,7 end</code></pre>
2526 <link href="https://blog.webb.page/2017/black-privilege-review"/>
2526 <link href="https://blog.webb.page/2017/black-privilege-review"/>
2527 <updated>2017-05-06T00:00:00.000Z</updated>
2527 <updated>2017-05-06T00:00:00.000Z</updated>
2528 <summary type="html"><![CDATA[Charlamagne Tha God can write a good book. Who knew?]]></summary>
2528 <summary type="html"><![CDATA[Charlamagne Tha God can write a good book. Who knew?]]></summary>
2529 <content type="html"><![CDATA[<p>Charlamagne Tha God is a radio personality of a nationally syndicated show called &quot;The Breakfast Club&quot; on Power 105.1. He&#39;s not well-liked by most people, especially the people he&#39;s interviewed and has disagreements with — this is because he speaks his mind. He doesn&#39;t like your latest album? He&#39;ll tell you. Are you embroiled in controversy? He&#39;ll ask about it. Basically, he asks the questions or says the things many listeners want to ask or are thinking. I count myself as one of his fans.</p>
2529 <content type="html"><![CDATA[<p>Charlamagne Tha God is a radio personality of a nationally syndicated show called &quot;The Breakfast Club&quot; on Power 105.1. He&#39;s not well-liked by most people, especially the people he&#39;s interviewed and has disagreements with — this is because he speaks his mind. He doesn&#39;t like your latest album? He&#39;ll tell you. Are you embroiled in controversy? He&#39;ll ask about it. Basically, he asks the questions or says the things many listeners want to ask or are thinking. I count myself as one of his fans.</p>
2530 <p>When Charlamagne mentioned he was writing a book, I knew I had to check it because...<strong>who the hell would give this man a book deal</strong> (<a href="http://www.simonandschusterpublishing.com/touchstone" title="Touchstone Books">Touchstone Books</a>, apparently)?</p>
2530 <p>When Charlamagne mentioned he was writing a book, I knew I had to check it because...<strong>who the hell would give this man a book deal</strong> (<a href="http://www.simonandschusterpublishing.com/touchstone" title="Touchstone Books">Touchstone Books</a>, apparently)?</p>
2531 <p>While reading, I found myself nodding in agreement when he arrived at the conclusion of a life lesson or when he realized he had to change his thought process. I also couldn&#39;t help noticing similarities in our lives. We loved getting those Pizza Hut coupons for free personal pizzas when we read lots of books in elementary school. Music was a means of both inspiration and escape in our teens. We never finished college. Despite that, we&#39;ve been able to succeed.</p>
2531 <p>While reading, I found myself nodding in agreement when he arrived at the conclusion of a life lesson or when he realized he had to change his thought process. I also couldn&#39;t help noticing similarities in our lives. We loved getting those Pizza Hut coupons for free personal pizzas when we read lots of books in elementary school. Music was a means of both inspiration and escape in our teens. We never finished college. Despite that, we&#39;ve been able to succeed.</p>
2532 <p>I was reminded that I used to live out my &quot;hood dreams&quot; vicariously through artists like <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipse" title="The Clipse on Wikipedia">Clipse</a>. While glamorizing the gangsta life, they also rapped about the obvious downsides. This was at a time when my peers listened to <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Z">Jay Z</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lox">The Lox</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Diplomats">Dipset</a>, &amp;c. I was almost exclusively <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Neptunes">Neptunes</a> and Will Smith. Yes, <em>I know</em>. I was clowned for liking Big Willie&#39;s music throughout all of middle and high school.</p>
2532 <p>I was reminded that I used to live out my &quot;hood dreams&quot; vicariously through artists like <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipse" title="The Clipse on Wikipedia">Clipse</a>. While glamorizing the gangsta life, they also rapped about the obvious downsides. This was at a time when my peers listened to <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Z">Jay Z</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lox">The Lox</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Diplomats">Dipset</a>, &amp;c. I was almost exclusively <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Neptunes">Neptunes</a> and Will Smith. Yes, <em>I know</em>. I was clowned for liking Big Willie&#39;s music throughout all of middle and high school.</p>
@@ -2624,7 +2624,7 end</code></pre>
2624 <p>Don&#39;t even get me started on how inconsistent TLD operators are with listing registrar names. In my testing, I found <a href="https://twitter.com/BeachfrontD/status/848404426557673472" title="Screenshot of the hot mess that = TLD operators">three variations</a> of the business name for Tucows. Like, why? Lucky for you, I asked customer support at both Tucows and Hover and was told this:</p>
2624 <p>Don&#39;t even get me started on how inconsistent TLD operators are with listing registrar names. In my testing, I found <a href="https://twitter.com/BeachfrontD/status/848404426557673472" title="Screenshot of the hot mess that = TLD operators">three variations</a> of the business name for Tucows. Like, why? Lucky for you, I asked customer support at both Tucows and Hover and was told this:</p>
2625 <blockquote>
2625 <blockquote>
2626 <p>The variations in the Tucows name for different domains is simply how it was inputted at the Registry level (each domain extension or tld has a governing entity known as a Registry), and since that is a human&#39;s job normally, it gets added to their system slightly different each time.</p>
2626 <p>The variations in the Tucows name for different domains is simply how it was inputted at the Registry level (each domain extension or tld has a governing entity known as a Registry), and since that is a human&#39;s job normally, it gets added to their system slightly different each time.</p>
2627 <p>— Jordan Q</p>
2627 <p>— Jordan Q</p>
2628 </blockquote>
2628 </blockquote>
2629 <p>In addition, domains purchased through Hover will list the registrar in WHOIS searches as Tucows. Gandi will show EPAG Domainservices GmbH, iwantmyname will show 1API GmbH, and so on. It would be <em>ideal</em> to show the actual reseller you purchased your domains from but that&#39;s not how WHOIS works. Oh well.</p>
2629 <p>In addition, domains purchased through Hover will list the registrar in WHOIS searches as Tucows. Gandi will show EPAG Domainservices GmbH, iwantmyname will show 1API GmbH, and so on. It would be <em>ideal</em> to show the actual reseller you purchased your domains from but that&#39;s not how WHOIS works. Oh well.</p>
2630 <h3 id="new-features">New features</h3>
2630 <h3 id="new-features">New features</h3>
@@ -2771,10 +2771,10 end</code></pre>
2771 <p>Lunchtime is sacred time in Switzerland. When I was on maternity leave, my husband came home for lunch to help me care for our daughter. This strengthened our marriage. Many families still reunite during weekdays over the lunch hour.</p>
2771 <p>Lunchtime is sacred time in Switzerland. When I was on maternity leave, my husband came home for lunch to help me care for our daughter. This strengthened our marriage. Many families still reunite during weekdays over the lunch hour.</p>
2772 </blockquote>
2772 </blockquote>
2773 <blockquote>
2773 <blockquote>
2774 <p>Swiss law mandates a 14-week maternity leave at a minimum of 80 percent pay.</p>
2774 <p>Swiss law mandates a 14-week maternity leave at a minimum of 80 percent pay.</p>
2775 </blockquote>
2775 </blockquote>
2776 <blockquote>
2776 <blockquote>
2777 <p>People in Europe took vacation seriously. Once, when I only took 10 days for a trip to Spain, my colleagues chastised me for taking so little time off. I learned to take vacation chunks in two-week intervals. Well rested, I noticed that I felt more productive and creative when I returned to work. Recent <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/opinion/sunday/relax-youll-be-more-productive.html?pagewanted=all&amp;_r=1&amp;&amp;gwh=AC034D10F64239B961A6E1CDE12C9332&amp;gwt=pay&amp;assetType=opinion" title="Link to an article by the New York Times">American research</a> confirms what I was feeling: Relaxing can make you <a href="http://www.vox.com/2014/7/22/5912369/creativity-vacation-work-office" title="Link to an article by Vox">more productive</a>.</p>
2777 <p>People in Europe took vacation seriously. Once, when I only took 10 days for a trip to Spain, my colleagues chastised me for taking so little time off. I learned to take vacation chunks in two-week intervals. Well rested, I noticed that I felt more productive and creative when I returned to work. Recent <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/opinion/sunday/relax-youll-be-more-productive.html?pagewanted=all&amp;_r=1&amp;&amp;gwh=AC034D10F64239B961A6E1CDE12C9332&amp;gwt=pay&amp;assetType=opinion" title="Link to an article by the New York Times">American research</a> confirms what I was feeling: Relaxing can make you <a href="http://www.vox.com/2014/7/22/5912369/creativity-vacation-work-office" title="Link to an article by Vox">more productive</a>.</p>
2778 </blockquote>
2778 </blockquote>
2779 <p>I could continue, but you get the gist.</p>
2779 <p>I could continue, but you get the gist.</p>
2780 <p>With self-imposed deadlines, I find that I am more creative in my problem-solving and often find better solutions than if I was working on problems without a time-sensitive goal attached. I believe the same thing would be applied to a shorter work day. A six-hour work day would also discourage long meetings without focus (well, long meetings <em>period</em>). I don&#39;t see big American companies making these quote drastic changes but startups? Hell yeah, definitely. Instead of focusing on &quot;perks&quot; like beer on tap, foosball tables, and game systems, &amp;c, why not focus on improving the lives of your employees so they can make dope shit?</p>
2780 <p>With self-imposed deadlines, I find that I am more creative in my problem-solving and often find better solutions than if I was working on problems without a time-sensitive goal attached. I believe the same thing would be applied to a shorter work day. A six-hour work day would also discourage long meetings without focus (well, long meetings <em>period</em>). I don&#39;t see big American companies making these quote drastic changes but startups? Hell yeah, definitely. Instead of focusing on &quot;perks&quot; like beer on tap, foosball tables, and game systems, &amp;c, why not focus on improving the lives of your employees so they can make dope shit?</p>
@@ -2862,42 +2862,42 end</code></pre>
2862 <p>As you can see, I have a <strong>lot</strong> going on. Eagle-eyed observers will see that some books have red dot stickers on them. Those are there to symbolize which books I have not read yet, or <em>started</em> but haven&#39;t finished. In alphabetical order, they are:</p>
2862 <p>As you can see, I have a <strong>lot</strong> going on. Eagle-eyed observers will see that some books have red dot stickers on them. Those are there to symbolize which books I have not read yet, or <em>started</em> but haven&#39;t finished. In alphabetical order, they are:</p>
2863 <ul>
2863 <ul>
2864 <li><del><em>1984</em> — George Orwell</del> <a href="/2017/1984-review">review</a></li>
2864 <li><del><em>1984</em> — George Orwell</del> <a href="/2017/1984-review">review</a></li>
2865 <li><em>The 48 Laws of Power</em> — Robert Greene</li>
2865 <li><em>The 48 Laws of Power</em> — Robert Greene</li>
2866 <li><em>A Culture of Innovation: Insider accounts of computing and life at BBN</em> — David Walden and Raymond Nickerson</li>
2866 <li><em>A Culture of Innovation: Insider accounts of computing and life at BBN</em> — David Walden and Raymond Nickerson</li>
2867 <li><em>The Art of Profitability</em> — Adrian Slywotzky</li>
2867 <li><em>The Art of Profitability</em> — Adrian Slywotzky</li>
2868 <li><em>The Art of the Start</em> — Guy Kawasaki</li>
2868 <li><em>The Art of the Start</em> — Guy Kawasaki</li>
2869 <li><em>Astronomy 101</em> — Carolyn Collins Petersen</li>
2869 <li><em>Astronomy 101</em> — Carolyn Collins Petersen</li>
2870 <li><em>Brave New World</em> — Aldous Huxley</li>
2870 <li><em>Brave New World</em> — Aldous Huxley</li>
2871 <li><em>Bring the Outdoors In</em> — Shane Powers and Gentl &amp; Hyers</li>
2871 <li><em>Bring the Outdoors In</em> — Shane Powers and Gentl &amp; Hyers</li>
2872 <li><em>Business Model Generation</em> — Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur</li>
2872 <li><em>Business Model Generation</em> — Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur</li>
2873 <li><em>The Cold Between</em> — Elizabeth Bonesteel</li>
2873 <li><em>The Cold Between</em> — Elizabeth Bonesteel</li>
2874 <li><em>Connectography</em> — Parag Khanna</li>
2874 <li><em>Connectography</em> — Parag Khanna</li>
2875 <li><em>Cosmos</em> — Carl Sagan</li>
2875 <li><em>Cosmos</em> — Carl Sagan</li>
2876 <li><del><em>Count Zero</em> — William Gibson</del> <a href="/2017/count-zero-review">review</a></li>
2876 <li><del><em>Count Zero</em> — William Gibson</del> <a href="/2017/count-zero-review">review</a></li>
2877 <li><em>Designing News</em> — Francesco Franchi</li>
2877 <li><em>Designing News</em> — Francesco Franchi</li>
2878 <li><em>Easy Origami</em> — John Montroll</li>
2878 <li><em>Easy Origami</em> — John Montroll</li>
2879 <li><em>The Fabric of the Cosmos</em> — Brian Greene</li>
2879 <li><em>The Fabric of the Cosmos</em> — Brian Greene</li>
2880 <li><em>Getting Things Done</em> — David Allen</li>
2880 <li><em>Getting Things Done</em> — David Allen</li>
2881 <li><em>HOLO 2</em> — Various Artists/Writers</li>
2881 <li><em>HOLO 2</em> — Various Artists/Writers</li>
2882 <li><em>Humans Of New York stories</em> — Brandon Stanton</li>
2882 <li><em>Humans Of New York stories</em> — Brandon Stanton</li>
2883 <li><em>Illuminations: Wisdom From This Planet&#39;s Greatest Minds</em> — Illuminatiam</li>
2883 <li><em>Illuminations: Wisdom From This Planet&#39;s Greatest Minds</em> — Illuminatiam</li>
2884 <li><em>Isaac Newton&#39;s Principia Mathematica Reissue</em> — Kronecker Wallis</li>
2884 <li><em>Isaac Newton&#39;s Principia Mathematica Reissue</em> — Kronecker Wallis</li>
2885 <li><em>The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047</em> — Lionel Shriver</li>
2885 <li><em>The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047</em> — Lionel Shriver</li>
2886 <li><em>The Mission Chinese Food Cookbook</em> — Danny Bowien and Chris Ying</li>
2886 <li><em>The Mission Chinese Food Cookbook</em> — Danny Bowien and Chris Ying</li>
2887 <li><em>Mona Lisa Overdrive</em> — William Gibson</li>
2887 <li><em>Mona Lisa Overdrive</em> — William Gibson</li>
2888 <li><em>NASA Graphic Standards Manual reissue</em> — Jesse Reed &amp; Hamish Smyth</li>
2888 <li><em>NASA Graphic Standards Manual reissue</em> — Jesse Reed &amp; Hamish Smyth</li>
2889 <li><em>The Nature of Code</em> — Daniel Shiffman</li>
2889 <li><em>The Nature of Code</em> — Daniel Shiffman</li>
2890 <li><em>NES/Famicom: a visual compendium</em> — Sam Dyer</li>
2890 <li><em>NES/Famicom: a visual compendium</em> — Sam Dyer</li>
2891 <li><em>NLP: The New Technology of Achievement</em> — NLP Comprehensive and Steve Andreas</li>
2891 <li><em>NLP: The New Technology of Achievement</em> — NLP Comprehensive and Steve Andreas</li>
2892 <li><em>Operating Systems: Design and Implementation</em> — Andrew S Tanenbaum and Albert S Woodhull</li>
2892 <li><em>Operating Systems: Design and Implementation</em> — Andrew S Tanenbaum and Albert S Woodhull</li>
2893 <li><em>A People&#39;s History of the United States</em> — Howard Zinn</li>
2893 <li><em>A People&#39;s History of the United States</em> — Howard Zinn</li>
2894 <li><em>Physics of the Future</em> — Michio Kaku</li>
2894 <li><em>Physics of the Future</em> — Michio Kaku</li>
2895 <li><em>Rayla 2212</em> — Ytasha L Womack</li>
2895 <li><em>Rayla 2212</em> — Ytasha L Womack</li>
2896 <li><em>The Remnants of Trust</em> — Elizabeth Bonesteel</li>
2896 <li><em>The Remnants of Trust</em> — Elizabeth Bonesteel</li>
2897 <li><em>The Secret Recipes</em> — Dominique Ansel</li>
2897 <li><em>The Secret Recipes</em> — Dominique Ansel</li>
2898 <li><em>Selling the Invisible</em> — Harry Beckwith</li>
2898 <li><em>Selling the Invisible</em> — Harry Beckwith</li>
2899 <li><em>Snowcrash</em> — Neal Stephenson</li>
2899 <li><em>Snowcrash</em> — Neal Stephenson</li>
2900 <li><em>Space Chronicles</em> — Neil deGrasse Tyson</li>
2900 <li><em>Space Chronicles</em> — Neil deGrasse Tyson</li>
2901 <li><em>Universal Principles of Design</em> — William Lidwell and Kritina Holden</li>
2901 <li><em>Universal Principles of Design</em> — William Lidwell and Kritina Holden</li>
2902 </ul>
2902 </ul>
2903 <p>That&#39;s 38 books in total. Of those, two of them aren&#39;t actually in my possession <em>yet</em>. <em>Isaac Newton&#39;s Principia Mathematica Reissue</em> and <em>NES/Famicom: a visual compendium</em> are both Kickstarter-backed books that should be delivered sometime this year.</p>
2903 <p>That&#39;s 38 books in total. Of those, two of them aren&#39;t actually in my possession <em>yet</em>. <em>Isaac Newton&#39;s Principia Mathematica Reissue</em> and <em>NES/Famicom: a visual compendium</em> are both Kickstarter-backed books that should be delivered sometime this year.</p>
@@ -12,7 +12,7
12 "items": [
12 "items": [
13 {
13 {
14 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2019/a-personal-api",
14 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2019/a-personal-api",
15 "content_html": "<h2 id=\"inspiration\">Inspiration</h2>\n<p>Shortly after <a href=\"/2019/future-of-the-operating-system-revisited-i\" title=\"The Future of the Operating System: Revisited, Part 1\">revisiting</a> my thoughts about the future of operating systems I was pestered with a recurring thought; what if one had a personal API sitting on a $5/month VPS (virtual private server) and interfaced with it for nearly everything they do online? It wasn&#39;t far-fetched for me to then imagine this personal API becoming more of a personal OS in a way (or maybe stylized, personalOS). With that in mind I realized that when thinking about updating <a href=\"https://webb.page\" title=\"My web page is Webb.Page! Hehehe\">my personal web page</a> I didn&#39;t want to update the content manually. Rather, I&#39;d want to update an API and have my site(s) automatically update. <strong>Oh yeah</strong>, why <em>not</em> have multiple sites update?</p>\n<p>A personal API would make it easy for people to decentralize parts of their digital lives. There are companies built upon the concept of decentralization and that&#39;s promising. A rising tide raises all ships, as they say, and I can see a day where non-technical people are spinning up servers as much as they&#39;re migrating data to a new smartphone (well, if they did all this via a nice UI).</p>\n<h2 id=\"use-cases\">Use Cases</h2>\n<p>Here&#39;s a use case: I&#39;m signed up to several social networks, forums, and I have a couple websites. I&#39;m a digital tastemaker and pride myself on being current and relevant. However, updating my account bio across these platforms is a 20-minute task that I dread doing. Never fear for my API has a biography module! Realistically, all the platforms I frequent won&#39;t have an API I can connect my own to, but a handful will. My personal API sends out update requests to the platforms it is connected to and updates my bio section when I publish the relevant changes to my API.</p>\n<p>That example may be a little contrived so let&#39;s try another one: I&#39;m a developer who prefers to self-host things whenever possible. I am also quite lazy and live by DRY (don&#39;t repeat yourself) and KISS (keep it simple, silly) principles to the extent I can without much difficulty. I&#39;m also fatigued and distrustful of the capability of online services in general to keep my data safe. If I trust nothing else I at least trust myself and a code base I can peruse.</p>\n<h2 id=\"version-alpha\">Version Alpha</h2>\n<p><em>Please keep in mind that this is still a super early idea and the purpose of this post is to get the particulars fleshed out.</em></p>\n<p>What follows is my proposed folder structure of the personal API. Modules come in two types: purpose and utility. Utility modules allow the purpose modules to do their thing, like retrieving/modifying/storing data (on DigitalOcean&#39;s Spaces, Amazon&#39;s S3, or your own storage location). Ideally you should never have to touch those modules unless you wanted to improve upon it or fork your own version. Purpose modules can be anything you think of and the examples I listed could be your personal Medium, Pinboard/Pinterest, Things, Spotify, Flickr/Instagram, Last.fm, and so on.</p>\n<pre><code class=\"language-text\">api\n├─ …\n├─ modules\n│ ├─ purpose\n│ │ ├─ blog\n│ │ ├─ bookmarks\n│ │ ├─ music\n│ │ ├─ photos\n│ │ ├─ portfolio\n│ │ ├─ reminders\n│ │ ├─ scrobbler\n│ │ └─ status\n│ └─ utility\n│ ├─ database\n│ └─ storage\n└─ …</code></pre>\n<p>The purpose functions would be able to call the utility functions to, well, function. <code>webb.page</code> will be the guinea pig for the initial release of personalOS. Once it works there I will update parts of <code>inc.sh</code> and <code>dsgn.agency</code> to take advantage of it as well.</p>\n<h2 id=\"why-bother\">Why Bother?</h2>\n<p>You, dear reader, are probably not terribly interested in self-hosting and dev ops. Even developers/engineers who know <em>how</em> to do it aren&#39;t interested. Some of the common reasons against self-hosting are fear (of the work involved), apathy (&quot;my data isn&#39;t super important anyway&quot;), time (the only valid reason IMHO), or a combination of the three. While I understand I also think <strong>it is incredibly important to claim your space on the Internet</strong>. We&#39;re all <a href=\"https://info.ideagrove.com/knowledgebase/digital-marketing/what-is-digital-sharecropping-and-why-is-it-a-bad-thing\" title=\"What is &#39;digital sharecropping&#39; and why is it a bad thing?\">digital sharecroppers</a> so why not tend to <em>our own space on the &#39;Net</em>?</p>\n<p>It&#39;s a helluva lot easier to monetize your content when it lives on your platform, or personalOS in this case. Monetization doesn&#39;t have to be your focus though. How about this: something that irritates me about Apple&#39;s Music app and iOS 13 is that I have no idea how to get my music that used to live in iTunes, onto my phone anymore. Once I build a music module for personalOS I can upload my music library to my own server and stream it on the go. The major streaming services are great and all but my music collection has rips from video game soundtracks, anime, and otherwise defunct groups with no content on these streaming services. Why would I give that up? Why <strong>should</strong> I?!</p>\n<h2 id=\"business-opportunity\">Business Opportunity?</h2>\n<p>Y&#39;know what would be nice? Having an easy way to share any files that you&#39;re hosting. Although, you may not want to expose your personal API server to the public. For this purpose, you could use a third-party site like <code>personal.sh</code> to generate shareable links (probably via <code>personal.sh/are</code>, I&#39;m a fan of <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_hack\" title=\"Explanation of &#39;Domain hack&#39; on Wikipedia\">domain hacking</a>).</p>\n<p>Because the Internet is open to all, there will inevitably be disturbing/disgusting/morally-bankrupt content shared through <code>personal.sh</code>. If/when that happens, the offending user will have their IP address blacklisted and put on display at <code>personal.sh/it</code>. It&#39;s no secret that anonymity gives some people courage to behave in a way that&#39;s unbecoming.</p>\n<h2 id=\"prior-art\">Prior Art</h2>\n<p>There&#39;s a company named Urbit who&#39;s mission is quite similar:</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>An Urbit is a networked personal server that runs your apps and stores your data, serves as your permanent online identity and puts you back in control of your digital life under a single login.</p>\n<p>When you’re ready.<br/>— <a href=\"https://twitter.com/urbitlive/status/1192262246384230400\" title=\"&#39;urbit live&#39; account on Twitter\">urbit live</a></p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>Only problem is, their official site makes their mission <a href=\"https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21672481\">quite</a> <a href=\"https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18908051\">confusing</a> <a href=\"https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=6438320\">to many</a>. I don&#39;t know about you but if I&#39;m entrusting my data to something I run, I want to have more than a <em>general idea</em> of how it works.</p>\n<p><strong>EDIT (2019.12.05):</strong> This post has generated lively discussion on <a href=\"https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21684949\">HackerNews</a> and as a result we now have more examples of prior art!</p>\n<ul>\n<li><a href=\"https://github.com/cjdelisle/cjdns\">cjdns</a></li>\n<li><a href=\"https://dogsheep.github.io\">Dogsheep</a>, by Simon Willisons</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://www.infoq.com/presentations/strong-types-actor-iot\">Islet</a>, by Carl Hewitt</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://libp2p.io\">libp2p</a></li>\n<li><a href=\"https://github.com/danfang/me-api\">me-api</a>, by Daniel Fang</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://github.com/karlicoss/my\">my</a>, by Dmitrii Gerasimov</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://perkeep.org\">Perkeep</a></li>\n<li><a href=\"https://solid.mit.edu\">SOLID (Social Linked Data)</a>, by Tim Berners-Lee</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://github.com/rigoneri/Syte2\">Syte2</a> / <a href=\"https://github.com/jake-101/Syte2-4-Zeit2.0\">Syte2 for Zeit Now v2</a>, by Rodrigo Neri and Jake Peterson</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://unwalled.garden\">Unwalled Garden</a></li>\n<li><a href=\"https://github.com/yggdrasil-network/yggdrasil-go\">Yggdrasil Network</a></li>\n</ul>\n<h2 id=\"fin\">FIN</h2>\n<p>Elsewhere, there exists portions of the personalOS concept of various development maturation levels. To me, this is proof of the worthwhile nature of this idea. Will this likely end up sitting in a repo for years after months of initial work? Probably. Hopefully not...we&#39;ll see how it goes. 🕸</p>\n",
15 "content_html": "<h2 id=\"inspiration\">Inspiration</h2>\n<p>Shortly after <a href=\"/2019/future-of-the-operating-system-revisited-i\" title=\"The Future of the Operating System: Revisited, Part 1\">revisiting</a> my thoughts about the future of operating systems I was pestered with a recurring thought; what if one had a personal API sitting on a $5/month VPS (virtual private server) and interfaced with it for nearly everything they do online? It wasn&#39;t far-fetched for me to then imagine this personal API becoming more of a personal OS in a way (or maybe stylized, personalOS). With that in mind I realized that when thinking about updating <a href=\"https://webb.page\" title=\"My web page is Webb.Page! Hehehe\">my personal web page</a> I didn&#39;t want to update the content manually. Rather, I&#39;d want to update an API and have my site(s) automatically update. <strong>Oh yeah</strong>, why <em>not</em> have multiple sites update?</p>\n<p>A personal API would make it easy for people to decentralize parts of their digital lives. There are companies built upon the concept of decentralization and that&#39;s promising. A rising tide raises all ships, as they say, and I can see a day where non-technical people are spinning up servers as much as they&#39;re migrating data to a new smartphone (well, if they did all this via a nice UI).</p>\n<h2 id=\"use-cases\">Use Cases</h2>\n<p>Here&#39;s a use case: I&#39;m signed up to several social networks, forums, and I have a couple websites. I&#39;m a digital tastemaker and pride myself on being current and relevant. However, updating my account bio across these platforms is a 20-minute task that I dread doing. Never fear for my API has a biography module! Realistically, all the platforms I frequent won&#39;t have an API I can connect my own to, but a handful will. My personal API sends out update requests to the platforms it is connected to and updates my bio section when I publish the relevant changes to my API.</p>\n<p>That example may be a little contrived so let&#39;s try another one: I&#39;m a developer who prefers to self-host things whenever possible. I am also quite lazy and live by DRY (don&#39;t repeat yourself) and KISS (keep it simple, silly) principles to the extent I can without much difficulty. I&#39;m also fatigued and distrustful of the capability of online services in general to keep my data safe. If I trust nothing else I at least trust myself and a code base I can peruse.</p>\n<h2 id=\"version-alpha\">Version Alpha</h2>\n<p><em>Please keep in mind that this is still a super early idea and the purpose of this post is to get the particulars fleshed out.</em></p>\n<p>What follows is my proposed folder structure of the personal API. Modules come in two types: purpose and utility. Utility modules allow the purpose modules to do their thing, like retrieving/modifying/storing data (on DigitalOcean&#39;s Spaces, Amazon&#39;s S3, or your own storage location). Ideally you should never have to touch those modules unless you wanted to improve upon it or fork your own version. Purpose modules can be anything you think of and the examples I listed could be your personal Medium, Pinboard/Pinterest, Things, Spotify, Flickr/Instagram, Last.fm, and so on.</p>\n<pre><code class=\"language-text\">api\n├─ …\n├─ modules\n│ ├─ purpose\n│ │ ├─ blog\n│ │ ├─ bookmarks\n│ │ ├─ music\n│ │ ├─ photos\n│ │ ├─ portfolio\n│ │ ├─ reminders\n│ │ ├─ scrobbler\n│ │ └─ status\n│ └─ utility\n│ ├─ database\n│ └─ storage\n└─ …</code></pre>\n<p>The purpose functions would be able to call the utility functions to, well, function. <code>webb.page</code> will be the guinea pig for the initial release of personalOS. Once it works there I will update parts of <code>inc.sh</code> and <code>dsgn.agency</code> to take advantage of it as well.</p>\n<h2 id=\"why-bother\">Why Bother?</h2>\n<p>You, dear reader, are probably not terribly interested in self-hosting and dev ops. Even developers/engineers who know <em>how</em> to do it aren&#39;t interested. Some of the common reasons against self-hosting are fear (of the work involved), apathy (&quot;my data isn&#39;t super important anyway&quot;), time (the only valid reason IMHO), or a combination of the three. While I understand I also think <strong>it is incredibly important to claim your space on the Internet</strong>. We&#39;re all <a href=\"https://info.ideagrove.com/knowledgebase/digital-marketing/what-is-digital-sharecropping-and-why-is-it-a-bad-thing\" title=\"What is &#39;digital sharecropping&#39; and why is it a bad thing?\">digital sharecroppers</a> so why not tend to <em>our own space on the &#39;Net</em>?</p>\n<p>It&#39;s a helluva lot easier to monetize your content when it lives on your platform, or personalOS in this case. Monetization doesn&#39;t have to be your focus though. How about this: something that irritates me about Apple&#39;s Music app and iOS 13 is that I have no idea how to get my music that used to live in iTunes, onto my phone anymore. Once I build a music module for personalOS I can upload my music library to my own server and stream it on the go. The major streaming services are great and all but my music collection has rips from video game soundtracks, anime, and otherwise defunct groups with no content on these streaming services. Why would I give that up? Why <strong>should</strong> I?!</p>\n<h2 id=\"business-opportunity\">Business Opportunity?</h2>\n<p>Y&#39;know what would be nice? Having an easy way to share any files that you&#39;re hosting. Although, you may not want to expose your personal API server to the public. For this purpose, you could use a third-party site like <code>personal.sh</code> to generate shareable links (probably via <code>personal.sh/are</code>, I&#39;m a fan of <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_hack\" title=\"Explanation of &#39;Domain hack&#39; on Wikipedia\">domain hacking</a>).</p>\n<p>Because the Internet is open to all, there will inevitably be disturbing/disgusting/morally-bankrupt content shared through <code>personal.sh</code>. If/when that happens, the offending user will have their IP address blacklisted and put on display at <code>personal.sh/it</code>. It&#39;s no secret that anonymity gives some people courage to behave in a way that&#39;s unbecoming.</p>\n<h2 id=\"prior-art\">Prior Art</h2>\n<p>There&#39;s a company named Urbit whose mission is quite similar:</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>An Urbit is a networked personal server that runs your apps and stores your data, serves as your permanent online identity and puts you back in control of your digital life under a single login.</p>\n<p>When you’re ready.<br/>— <a href=\"https://twitter.com/urbitlive/status/1192262246384230400\" title=\"&#39;urbit live&#39; account on Twitter\">urbit live</a></p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>Only problem is, their official site makes their mission <a href=\"https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21672481\">quite</a> <a href=\"https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18908051\">confusing</a> <a href=\"https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=6438320\">to many</a>. I don&#39;t know about you but if I&#39;m entrusting my data to something I run, I want to have more than a <em>general idea</em> of how it works.</p>\n<p><strong>EDIT (2019.12.05):</strong> This post has generated lively discussion on <a href=\"https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21684949\">HackerNews</a> and as a result we now have more examples of prior art!</p>\n<ul>\n<li><a href=\"https://github.com/cjdelisle/cjdns\">cjdns</a></li>\n<li><a href=\"https://dogsheep.github.io\">Dogsheep</a>, by Simon Willisons</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://www.infoq.com/presentations/strong-types-actor-iot\">Islet</a>, by Carl Hewitt</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://libp2p.io\">libp2p</a></li>\n<li><a href=\"https://github.com/danfang/me-api\">me-api</a>, by Daniel Fang</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://github.com/karlicoss/my\">my</a>, by Dmitrii Gerasimov</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://perkeep.org\">Perkeep</a></li>\n<li><a href=\"https://solid.mit.edu\">SOLID (Social Linked Data)</a>, by Tim Berners-Lee</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://github.com/rigoneri/Syte2\">Syte2</a> / <a href=\"https://github.com/jake-101/Syte2-4-Zeit2.0\">Syte2 for Zeit Now v2</a>, by Rodrigo Neri and Jake Peterson</li>\n<li><a href=\"https://unwalled.garden\">Unwalled Garden</a></li>\n<li><a href=\"https://github.com/yggdrasil-network/yggdrasil-go\">Yggdrasil Network</a></li>\n</ul>\n<h2 id=\"fin\">FIN</h2>\n<p>Elsewhere, there exists portions of the personalOS concept of various development maturation levels. To me, this is proof of the worthwhile nature of this idea. Will this likely end up sitting in a repo for years after months of initial work? Probably. Hopefully not...we&#39;ll see how it goes. 🕸</p>\n",
16 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2019/a-personal-api",
16 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2019/a-personal-api",
17 "title": "A personal API",
17 "title": "A personal API",
18 "summary": "You are the operating system",
18 "summary": "You are the operating system",
@@ -25,7 +25,7
25 },
25 },
26 {
26 {
27 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2019/a-decade-in-tech",
27 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2019/a-decade-in-tech",
28 "content_html": "<h3 id=\"the-beginning\">The Beginning</h3>\n<p>I got my start in the web/tech space over a decade ago, during the economic recession of 2008.</p>\n<p>Two years prior I was in college for a couple months until Johnson &amp; Wales&#39; campus police called to let me know I&#39;d need to leave by the end of the week. Unbeknownst to me the college fund that was <em>allegedly</em> prepared for me never existed (!!) and the funny thing about bounced checks is, <em>no one likes them</em>; especially an institution that needs to pay its faculty. Anyhoo, in 2008 I was tasked with &quot;getting myself back into school&quot; <em>somehow</em> and was sent to the next town over from JWU to start.</p>\n<p>My landlord, a portly self-deprecating guy with a glass eye and a heart of friggin&#39; <em>gold</em>, allowed me stay rent free as long as I kept him up to date with my job search progress. In my downtime I perused online communities like deviantART and Pixelfuckers (defunct) and attempted to emulate what I saw in the awesome desktop modding scene. That led to attempting vector art and boy, this was frustrating as hell to learn. Photoshop&#39;s pen tool just did not make sense at <em>all</em> and Illustrator was too strange. One day...it clicked. I could do it!</p>\n<p><a href=\"https://www.deviantart.com/nokadota/art/2nd-Vector-72286668\"><img src=\"/assets/images/2019/a-decade-in-tech-a.png\" alt=\"2nd Vector\"/></a></p>\n<p>Yes, revel in this <em>monstrosity</em>. Admire it. <strong>Fear</strong> it (the <a href=\"https://www.deviantart.com/nokadota/art/Above-The-Clouds-71695497\">later version</a> of this looks <em>way</em> better).</p>\n<p>At some point I was designing so <a href=\"https://www.deviantart.com/nokadota/gallery\">much</a> that I decided I needed a website, naturally. I mocked something in Photoshop and emailed a PSD to HTML service to see how much it would cost to convert my &quot;super awesome&quot; design to a website and I was quoted either $100 or $500. Whichever amount it was, I was <em>incensed</em>. Furious, even. Couldn&#39;t they see I was trying to start something? Why would they charge me so much? The au<em>dacity</em> of these people!</p>\n<p>In my anger, I learned how to code my first website[1].</p>\n<p>Yes. I was petulant and figured it out because I was misguided in my anger at someone/some people trying to run a business in a recession. It sounds quite silly in hindsight but, there you have it.</p>\n<p>At that point I also understood that web design and development is not something easily done <em>correctly</em>. Doesn&#39;t it make sense why someone would charge to do it for you? Armed with this newfound knowledge I dove into the Internet head first and scoured it for web development tips. Often, these tips came from horribly designed websites 🥴. Indeed there was a time before Envato and their Tuts+ tutorial sites burst onto the scene.</p>\n<h3 id=\"i-made-it\">I Made It</h3>\n<p>Sometime in 2012 I was working retail and applying for web design/development roles I was <strong>definitely</strong> not suited for but YOLO (pretty sure YOLO wasn&#39;t said then but y&#39;know, same energy)! Just fire and forget, leave for work, come back home and check email. One day I got a response back from <a href=\"https://thoughtbot.com\">thoughtbot</a>, a design/development agency in Downtown Crossing (Boston)! One of the co-founders wanted me to come in and interview for their apprenticeship program. Elated, I made the trek downtown with my heavy laptop and couldn&#39;t wait to show off my work.</p>\n<p>My elation disappated when <a href=\"https://chad.is\">Chad Mazolla</a> said (paraphrasing, too long ago):</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>Your code is terrible...but your design is good. Great, even! We need more stuff like this on the Internet.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>And with that, I was in! The program lasted a few short months and while I was the only one who wasn&#39;t offered a job through thoughtbot or their partner companies afterward, I will say that it was the best experience I could have had at that point in my life. If nothing else, I finally had something I could put on my non-retail resume!</p>\n<p>Over the next couple years I would go on to do contract jobs and later work for startup after startup after startup. I&#39;ve worked for a &quot;regular&quot; company here and there but end up going back to startups. Even though they come with uncertainty[2], they are often working on challenging ideas and projects that can change some aspect of the world in interesting ways. I&#39;m drawn to that. I also love learning how to do things I either don&#39;t feel like learning on my own time or never thought about learning. <strong>The best teacher is experience so why not <em>get paid</em> to do it?</strong> This allows you to initiate ambitious side projects solo instead of waiting/relying on someone else to get an MVP running.</p>\n<p>Perhaps more important than the technical skills acquired, I learned how <em>not</em> to treat people. Sometimes this was an <a href=\"https://2016.dsgn.io/thoughts/post/the-importance-of-process\">analysis</a> of <em>my own behavior</em> but more often than not the actions of <em>leadership</em> exemplified this.</p>\n<h3 id=\"scenarios\">Scenarios</h3>\n<p>The following scenarios are situations I&#39;ve been on the receiving end of.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><p>You&#39;re an apprentice and a developer mentoring someone else in the program regularly talks over you and pumps up his apprentice whenever he can. Maybe his disdain for you is because you&#39;re self-taught or was personally invited by the co-CEO to join the program. Or maybe the developer didn&#39;t like you having regular conversation with the (female) office manager. You&#39;re new, you just want to absorb information from everywhere.</p>\n<ul>\n<li>You learn many years later that this same developer also treated prospective clients quite rudely.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><p>CEO picks his nose and makes eye contact with you. This happens enough that you learn how to have a blind spot whenever you turn your head and see him in your peripheral vision.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>As a contractor, you end up doing the job of the guy you&#39;re reporting under while he browses <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joystiq\">Joystiq</a> for gaming news. You are later fired and realize he threw you under the bus for his work not getting done. <strong>Many</strong> years later you see him in a Target department store and after recognizing you he discovers a sudden interest in ceiling architecture.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>As you&#39;re dealing with the excrutiating sorrow of miscarriage, the CEO puts you on a dubious &quot;project&quot; for his father&#39;s company. A week or two later you&#39;re in a firing meeting, sans CEO. In the minutes following the firing you look around for the CEO to have a conversation with him but he&#39;s nowhere to be found, even though you just saw him five minutes prior.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>CEO constantly lies to you and your coworkers about the health of the company and surprises y&#39;all a week or so from Christmas <em>on pay day</em> with &quot;Hey, sorry, we can&#39;t pay you&quot; phone call. Money eventually shows up but this happens at least once more before the company folds.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>CEO loves your work and mindset and tasks you with unleashing your creativity on core properties. Then come caveats. You create something cool, you guess, with caveats because core users would be &quot;confused&quot; by drastic changes. A month or so later, CEO okays a developer <em>not</em> hired for their design sensibilities to drastically redesign the core product. CEO reiterates your importance while restricting your expression.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>You notice there&#39;s someone on the platform you are helping develop who has advocated for harm and negative energy towards people who share your creed/likeness/ethnicity. You get on a call with the CEO and he not only downplays the matter but he disregards how you feel about it. He also claims organizations like <a href=\"https://www.splcenter.org\">SPLC</a> are disengenous and blow things out of proportion.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>These scenarios are situations I&#39;ve witnessed and/or stepped in to defend/protect.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><p>Designers wrack their brains over new features and present to UX lead for her expert opinion. Idea gets shut down due to claim by lead over &quot;impossible&quot;[3] claims.</p>\n<ul>\n<li>I walk by and overhear the designers speaking amongst themselves, bummed about yet another idea that <em>seems</em> feasible but apparently &quot;isn&#39;t&quot;.</li>\n<li>I create a branch and implement their idea in ~10 minutes. Designers are happy, UX lead is not.</li>\n<li>To be clear, this doesn&#39;t add extra work for anyone but me.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><p>Back-end engineers who want something done on the front-end approach UX lead. &quot;Too much work&quot;, &quot;not worth it&quot;, &quot;impossible&quot;, and so on is claimed.</p>\n<ul>\n<li>I&#39;m present during this conversation and rattle off similar experiences I&#39;ve had in my personal projects that relate.</li>\n<li>Developers are happy, UX lead is not.</li>\n<li>No extra work for anyone but me and it&#39;s not an obscene amount.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><p>At an annual all-hands event, CTO speaks about how he learned the importance of listening from a leadership course he&#39;s been taking. 10 minutes later, CEO blames entire company (and himself but not really) for our lack of innovation leading to the then-(still?)negative status of the company while the CTO stares at the ground in deep thought.</p>\n<ul>\n<li>A developer protests accusation and mentions several instances where he tried to provide input, only to be shut down by CEO.</li>\n<li>Conversation turns into a shouting match.</li>\n<li>Other developers jump in to co-sign the initial protest.</li>\n<li>You later learn that some developers at the company ignore the CEO and pursue things <em>they</em> know they need to work on.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><p>Marketing team repeatedly express frustration with lack of non-developer-friendly tooling for things like updating the company blog, sending email blasts, and so on. CEO is a technical developer and regularly dismisses them, starting sentences with things like &quot;It&#39;s so easy&quot; and &quot;All you have to do is...c&#39;mon, it&#39;s not so bad.&quot;</p>\n<ul>\n<li>I don&#39;t have much to do so I offer to improve some aspects of their job. After initial pushback I&#39;m begrungingly allowed to do so.</li>\n<li>Two days later, I&#39;m tasked with going about this process with caveats (and throwing away substantial work in the process).</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><p>CEO has something negative to say about anyone who quits. &quot;He wasn&#39;t that great anyway&quot; and things like that, often on conference calls.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>These are all the scenarios I could list off the top of my head. I&#39;m a positive person by nature so this was an uncomfortable walk down Memory Lane.</p>\n<p>For people in the web/tech space, the aforementioned scenarios are quite common. Heck, I&#39;m quite sure they echo what happened <em>today</em> somewhere...and you witnessed it. A common thread that links the leadership mentioned (aside from the CTO) is apathy; a complete lack of empathy, social understanding/awareness, or just <em>care</em>. In the comment about my self analysis earlier, I linked a blog post where I realized I put my ego before the team I was hired to work with. I was, quite frankly, a jackass[4] and there&#39;s no room for one unless you work at a zoo. Self-reflection is a useful tool you should pull out every now and then and as you can probably tell, most people don&#39;t utilize it.</p>\n<h3 id=\"software-is-hard-relationships-are-easy\">Software is hard, relationships are easy</h3>\n<blockquote>\n<p>If you don&#39;t build your dream, someone will hire you to help build theirs.<br/>— Tony Gaskin</p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>I reflect upon this quote often as I help people build their dreams (startups) while also building <a href=\"https://socii.network\">my own</a>. I do believe there&#39;s been a sea change in the industry around employee happiness and retention. Have a look at job postings and you will see work satisfaction and happiness as a perk.</p>\n<p>No one wants to work in a hostile environment and after a while, people realize they don&#39;t have to put up with bullshit and they quit (or are fired before they get the chance, lol). To echo the tone of Gaskin&#39;s quote but modified for business leadership:</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>In order to build your dream, hire the best people and treat them like family.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>Assuming you have a great family or a close cadre of friends you regard as family, would you treat them like the aforementioned leaders have? Probably not. It&#39;s really not that difficult to be a decent person.</p>\n<p>One of my closest friends is in a coding bootcamp and shares his works in progress with me and another close friend on a regular basis. I&#39;m the most technical of us but what sense would it make for me to downplay his efforts? What would I gain from that? It&#39;s my responsibility to assist in his professional development because I have the means to and I consider him family.</p>\n<p>A decade is a long time and software and startups come and go. Even people do. Memories, do not (I mean, aside from cognitive disorders).</p>\n<p>You remember the developer that treated me like shit during my apprenticeship? His name came up in an interview I had two years ago via my interviewer, half a decade later! Therefore, it is <em>imperitive</em> that you treat people how you would like to be treated, your reputation could precede you whether it&#39;s positive or not.</p>\n<p>No matter what life-changing product you embark on or assist with creating, you will get there a helluva lot faster surrounded by people who respect you and vice-versa. If you&#39;ve forgotten about the Golden Rule, here&#39;s a handy <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Rule\">refresher</a>. 🕸</p>\n<br/>\n<br/>\n<br/>\n<br/>\n<br/>\n<br/>\n\n<h3 id=\"footnotes\">Footnotes</h3>\n<ol>\n<li><p>My first domain name was <code>pw-software.com</code> (it now redirects to <code>webb.page</code>). Back in the early 2010s, I blogged about design and redesigned my site at least three times a year. It was the <em>hottest</em> of messes. Back then I used Google and regularly searched for &quot;PW Software&quot; to check my search ranking. For a while, a company called &quot;P+W Software&quot; was the first result. The constant linking of my website to Facebook and deviantART improved SEO so much that I soon took the number one spot. P+W Software was later <a href=\"https://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/press-release/consumer-health-technologies-inc-acquires-pw-software\">acquired</a> by another company. When ICANN released the <code>.page</code> TLD I was absolutely <strong>required</strong> to obtain what&#39;s probably the nicest domain on the planet and make it my new default home on the Internet.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>All but two startups I&#39;ve worked for no longer exist. The first one was acquired but I was seasonal help and thus was too far gone to delight in their success. The second one seems like it&#39;s not doing too well behind the scenes.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>A word I hate more than almost anything (the taste of asparagus will be difficult to unseat) is &quot;impossible&quot; and to hear professionals in the web/tech space use this word so casually is <strong>frustrating</strong>. We literally have supercomputers in our pockets to share <em>memes</em> but it&#39;s &quot;impossible&quot; to make text with a drop shadow expand across the screen before flipping into an explosion of color with emoji rain. <strong>Impossible is not a word, it&#39;s an excuse.</strong></p>\n</li>\n<li><p>I really wanted to underscore how much of a jackass I was prior to that post being published but was advised against it by leadership. This most likely had something to do with editorial voice of the company but few words exist to exemplify negative behavior with such conciseness.</p>\n</li>\n</ol>\n",
28 "content_html": "<h3 id=\"the-beginning\">The Beginning</h3>\n<p>I got my start in the web/tech space over a decade ago, during the economic recession of 2008.</p>\n<p>Two years prior I was in college for a couple months until Johnson &amp; Wales&#39; campus police called to let me know I&#39;d need to leave by the end of the week. Unbeknownst to me the college fund that was <em>allegedly</em> prepared for me never existed (!!) and the funny thing about bounced checks is, <em>no one likes them</em>; especially an institution that needs to pay its faculty. Anyhoo, in 2008 I was tasked with &quot;getting myself back into school&quot; <em>somehow</em> and was sent to the next town over from JWU to start.</p>\n<p>My landlord, a portly self-deprecating guy with a glass eye and a heart of friggin&#39; <em>gold</em>, allowed me stay rent free as long as I kept him up to date with my job search progress. In my downtime I perused online communities like deviantART and Pixelfuckers (defunct) and attempted to emulate what I saw in the awesome desktop modding scene. That led to attempting vector art and boy, this was frustrating as hell to learn. Photoshop&#39;s pen tool just did not make sense at <em>all</em> and Illustrator was too strange. One day...it clicked. I could do it!</p>\n<p><a href=\"https://www.deviantart.com/nokadota/art/2nd-Vector-72286668\"><img src=\"/assets/images/2019/a-decade-in-tech-a.png\" alt=\"2nd Vector\"/></a></p>\n<p>Yes, revel in this <em>monstrosity</em>. Admire it. <strong>Fear</strong> it (the <a href=\"https://www.deviantart.com/nokadota/art/Above-The-Clouds-71695497\">later version</a> of this looks <em>way</em> better).</p>\n<p>At some point I was designing so <a href=\"https://www.deviantart.com/nokadota/gallery\">much</a> that I decided I needed a website, naturally. I mocked something in Photoshop and emailed a PSD to HTML service to see how much it would cost to convert my &quot;super awesome&quot; design to a website and I was quoted either $100 or $500. Whichever amount it was, I was <em>incensed</em>. Furious, even. Couldn&#39;t they see I was trying to start something? Why would they charge me so much? The au<em>dacity</em> of these people!</p>\n<p>In my anger, I learned how to code my first website[1].</p>\n<p>Yes. I was petulant and figured it out because I was misguided in my anger at someone/some people trying to run a business in a recession. It sounds quite silly in hindsight but, there you have it.</p>\n<p>At that point I also understood that web design and development is not something easily done <em>correctly</em>. Doesn&#39;t it make sense why someone would charge to do it for you? Armed with this newfound knowledge I dove into the Internet head first and scoured it for web development tips. Often, these tips came from horribly designed websites 🥴. Indeed there was a time before Envato and their Tuts+ tutorial sites burst onto the scene.</p>\n<h3 id=\"i-made-it\">I Made It</h3>\n<p>Sometime in 2012 I was working retail and applying for web design/development roles I was <strong>definitely</strong> not suited for but YOLO (pretty sure YOLO wasn&#39;t said then but y&#39;know, same energy)! Just fire and forget, leave for work, come back home and check email. One day I got a response back from <a href=\"https://thoughtbot.com\">thoughtbot</a>, a design/development agency in Downtown Crossing (Boston)! One of the co-founders wanted me to come in and interview for their apprenticeship program. Elated, I made the trek downtown with my heavy laptop and couldn&#39;t wait to show off my work.</p>\n<p>My elation disappated when <a href=\"https://chad.is\">Chad Mazolla</a> said (paraphrasing, too long ago):</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>Your code is terrible...but your design is good. Great, even! We need more stuff like this on the Internet.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>And with that, I was in! The program lasted a few short months and while I was the only one who wasn&#39;t offered a job through thoughtbot or their partner companies afterward, I will say that it was the best experience I could have had at that point in my life. If nothing else, I finally had something I could put on my non-retail resume!</p>\n<p>Over the next couple years I would go on to do contract jobs and later work for startup after startup after startup. I&#39;ve worked for a &quot;regular&quot; company here and there but end up going back to startups. Even though they come with uncertainty[2], they are often working on challenging ideas and projects that can change some aspect of the world in interesting ways. I&#39;m drawn to that. I also love learning how to do things I either don&#39;t feel like learning on my own time or never thought about learning. <strong>The best teacher is experience so why not <em>get paid</em> to do it?</strong> This allows you to initiate ambitious side projects solo instead of waiting/relying on someone else to get an MVP running.</p>\n<p>Perhaps more important than the technical skills acquired, I learned how <em>not</em> to treat people. Sometimes this was an <a href=\"https://2016.dsgn.io/thoughts/post/the-importance-of-process\">analysis</a> of <em>my own behavior</em> but more often than not the actions of <em>leadership</em> exemplified this.</p>\n<h3 id=\"scenarios\">Scenarios</h3>\n<p>The following scenarios are situations I&#39;ve been on the receiving end of.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><p>You&#39;re an apprentice and a developer mentoring someone else in the program regularly talks over you and pumps up his apprentice whenever he can. Maybe his disdain for you is because you&#39;re self-taught or was personally invited by the co-CEO to join the program. Or maybe the developer didn&#39;t like you having regular conversation with the (female) office manager. You&#39;re new, you just want to absorb information from everywhere.</p>\n<ul>\n<li>You learn many years later that this same developer also treated prospective clients quite rudely.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><p>CEO picks his nose and makes eye contact with you. This happens enough that you learn how to have a blind spot whenever you turn your head and see him in your peripheral vision.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>As a contractor, you end up doing the job of the guy you&#39;re reporting under while he browses <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joystiq\">Joystiq</a> for gaming news. You are later fired and realize he threw you under the bus for his work not getting done. <strong>Many</strong> years later you see him in a Target department store and after recognizing you he discovers a sudden interest in ceiling architecture.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>As you&#39;re dealing with the excrutiating sorrow of miscarriage, the CEO puts you on a dubious &quot;project&quot; for his father&#39;s company. A week or two later you&#39;re in a firing meeting, sans CEO. In the minutes following the firing you look around for the CEO to have a conversation with him but he&#39;s nowhere to be found, even though you just saw him five minutes prior.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>CEO constantly lies to you and your coworkers about the health of the company and surprises y&#39;all a week or so from Christmas <em>on pay day</em> with &quot;Hey, sorry, we can&#39;t pay you&quot; phone call. Money eventually shows up but this happens at least once more before the company folds.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>CEO loves your work and mindset and tasks you with unleashing your creativity on core properties. Then come caveats. You create something cool, you guess, with caveats because core users would be &quot;confused&quot; by drastic changes. A month or so later, CEO okays a developer <em>not</em> hired for their design sensibilities to drastically redesign the core product. CEO reiterates your importance while restricting your expression.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>You notice there&#39;s someone on the platform you are helping develop who has advocated for harm and negative energy towards people who share your creed/likeness/ethnicity. You get on a call with the CEO and he not only downplays the matter but he disregards how you feel about it. He also claims organizations like <a href=\"https://www.splcenter.org\">SPLC</a> are disengenous and blow things out of proportion.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>These scenarios are situations I&#39;ve witnessed and/or stepped in to defend/protect.</p>\n<ul>\n<li><p>Designers wrack their brains over new features and present to UX lead for her expert opinion. Idea gets shut down due to claim by lead over &quot;impossible&quot;[3] claims.</p>\n<ul>\n<li>I walk by and overhear the designers speaking amongst themselves, bummed about yet another idea that <em>seems</em> feasible but apparently &quot;isn&#39;t&quot;.</li>\n<li>I create a branch and implement their idea in ~10 minutes. Designers are happy, UX lead is not.</li>\n<li>To be clear, this doesn&#39;t add extra work for anyone but me.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><p>Back-end engineers who want something done on the front-end approach UX lead. &quot;Too much work&quot;, &quot;not worth it&quot;, &quot;impossible&quot;, and so on is claimed.</p>\n<ul>\n<li>I&#39;m present during this conversation and rattle off similar experiences I&#39;ve had in my personal projects that relate.</li>\n<li>Developers are happy, UX lead is not.</li>\n<li>No extra work for anyone but me and it&#39;s not an obscene amount.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><p>At an annual all-hands event, CTO speaks about how he learned the importance of listening from a leadership course he&#39;s been taking. 10 minutes later, CEO blames entire company (and himself but not really) for our lack of innovation leading to the then-(still?)negative status of the company while the CTO stares at the ground in deep thought.</p>\n<ul>\n<li>A developer protests accusation and mentions several instances where he tried to provide input, only to be shut down by CEO.</li>\n<li>Conversation turns into a shouting match.</li>\n<li>Other developers jump in to co-sign the initial protest.</li>\n<li>You later learn that some developers at the company ignore the CEO and pursue things <em>they</em> know they need to work on.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><p>Marketing team repeatedly express frustration with lack of non-developer-friendly tooling for things like updating the company blog, sending email blasts, and so on. CEO is a technical developer and regularly dismisses them, starting sentences with things like &quot;It&#39;s so easy&quot; and &quot;All you have to do is...c&#39;mon, it&#39;s not so bad.&quot;</p>\n<ul>\n<li>I don&#39;t have much to do so I offer to improve some aspects of their job. After initial pushback I&#39;m begrungingly allowed to do so.</li>\n<li>Two days later, I&#39;m tasked with going about this process with caveats (and throwing away substantial work in the process).</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li><p>CEO has something negative to say about anyone who quits. &quot;He wasn&#39;t that great anyway&quot; and things like that, often on conference calls.</p>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>These are all the scenarios I could list off the top of my head. I&#39;m a positive person by nature so this was an uncomfortable walk down Memory Lane.</p>\n<p>For people in the web/tech space, the aforementioned scenarios are quite common. Heck, I&#39;m quite sure they echo what happened <em>today</em> somewhere...and you witnessed it. A common thread that links the leadership mentioned (aside from the CTO) is apathy; a complete lack of empathy, social understanding/awareness, or just <em>care</em>. In the comment about my self analysis earlier, I linked a blog post where I realized I put my ego before the team I was hired to work with. I was, quite frankly, a jackass[4] and there&#39;s no room for one unless you work at a zoo. Self-reflection is a useful tool you should pull out every now and then and as you can probably tell, most people don&#39;t utilize it.</p>\n<h3 id=\"software-is-hard-relationships-are-easy\">Software is hard, relationships are easy</h3>\n<blockquote>\n<p>If you don&#39;t build your dream, someone will hire you to help build theirs.<br/>— Tony Gaskin</p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>I reflect upon this quote often as I help people build their dreams (startups) while also building <a href=\"https://socii.network\">my own</a>. I do believe there&#39;s been a sea change in the industry around employee happiness and retention. Have a look at job postings and you will see work satisfaction and happiness as a perk.</p>\n<p>No one wants to work in a hostile environment and after a while, people realize they don&#39;t have to put up with bullshit and they quit (or are fired before they get the chance, lol). To echo the tone of Gaskin&#39;s quote but modified for business leadership:</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>In order to build your dream, hire the best people and treat them like family.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>Assuming you have a great family or a close cadre of friends you regard as family, would you treat them like the aforementioned leaders have? Probably not. It&#39;s really not that difficult to be a decent person.</p>\n<p>One of my closest friends is in a coding bootcamp and shares his works in progress with me and another close friend on a regular basis. I&#39;m the most technical of us but what sense would it make for me to downplay his efforts? What would I gain from that? It&#39;s my responsibility to assist in his professional development because I have the means to and I consider him family.</p>\n<p>A decade is a long time and software and startups come and go. Even people do. Memories, do not (I mean, aside from cognitive disorders).</p>\n<p>You remember the developer that treated me like shit during my apprenticeship? His name came up in an interview I had two years ago via my interviewer, half a decade later! Therefore, it is <em>imperitive</em> that you treat people how you would like to be treated, your reputation could precede you whether it&#39;s positive or not.</p>\n<p>No matter what life-changing product you embark on or assist with creating, you will get there a helluva lot faster surrounded by people who respect you and vice-versa. If you&#39;ve forgotten about the Golden Rule, here&#39;s a handy <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Rule\">refresher</a>. 🕸</p>\n<br/>\n<br/>\n<br/>\n<br/>\n<br/>\n<br/>\n\n<h3 id=\"footnotes\">Footnotes</h3>\n<ol>\n<li><p>My first domain name was <code>pw-software.com</code> (it now redirects to <code>webb.page</code>). Back in the early 2010s, I blogged about design and redesigned my site at least three times a year. It was the <em>hottest</em> of messes. Back then I used Google and regularly searched for &quot;PW Software&quot; to check my search ranking. For a while, a company called &quot;P+W Software&quot; was the first result. The constant linking of my website to Facebook and deviantART improved SEO so much that I soon took the number one spot. P+W Software was later <a href=\"https://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/press-release/consumer-health-technologies-inc-acquires-pw-software\">acquired</a> by another company. When ICANN released the <code>.page</code> TLD I was absolutely <strong>required</strong> to obtain what&#39;s probably the nicest domain on the planet and make it my new default home on the Internet.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>All but two startups I&#39;ve worked for no longer exist. The first one was acquired but I was seasonal help and thus was too far gone to delight in their success. The second one seems like it&#39;s not doing too well behind the scenes.</p>\n</li>\n<li><p>A word I hate more than almost anything (the taste of asparagus will be difficult to unseat) is &quot;impossible&quot; and to hear professionals in the web/tech space use this word so casually is <strong>frustrating</strong>. We literally have supercomputers in our pockets to share <em>memes</em> but it&#39;s &quot;impossible&quot; to make text with a drop shadow expand across the screen before flipping into an explosion of color with emoji rain. <strong>Impossible is not a word, it&#39;s an excuse.</strong></p>\n</li>\n<li><p>I really wanted to underscore how much of a jackass I was prior to that post being published but was advised against it by leadership. This most likely had something to do with editorial voice of the company but few words exist to exemplify negative behavior with such conciseness.</p>\n</li>\n</ol>\n",
29 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2019/a-decade-in-tech",
29 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2019/a-decade-in-tech",
30 "title": "A decade in tech&#58; a retrospective",
30 "title": "A decade in tech&#58; a retrospective",
31 "summary": "Startups are hard, respect is easy",
31 "summary": "Startups are hard, respect is easy",
@@ -415,7 +415,7
415 },
415 },
416 {
416 {
417 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/black-privilege-review",
417 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/black-privilege-review",
418 "content_html": "<p>Charlamagne Tha God is a radio personality of a nationally syndicated show called &quot;The Breakfast Club&quot; on Power 105.1. He&#39;s not well-liked by most people, especially the people he&#39;s interviewed and has disagreements with — this is because he speaks his mind. He doesn&#39;t like your latest album? He&#39;ll tell you. Are you embroiled in controversy? He&#39;ll ask about it. Basically, he asks the questions or says the things many listeners want to ask or are thinking. I count myself as one of his fans.</p>\n<p>When Charlamagne mentioned he was writing a book, I knew I had to check it because...<strong>who the hell would give this man a book deal</strong> (<a href=\"http://www.simonandschusterpublishing.com/touchstone\" title=\"Touchstone Books\">Touchstone Books</a>, apparently)?</p>\n<p>While reading, I found myself nodding in agreement when he arrived at the conclusion of a life lesson or when he realized he had to change his thought process. I also couldn&#39;t help noticing similarities in our lives. We loved getting those Pizza Hut coupons for free personal pizzas when we read lots of books in elementary school. Music was a means of both inspiration and escape in our teens. We never finished college. Despite that, we&#39;ve been able to succeed.</p>\n<p>I was reminded that I used to live out my &quot;hood dreams&quot; vicariously through artists like <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipse\" title=\"The Clipse on Wikipedia\">Clipse</a>. While glamorizing the gangsta life, they also rapped about the obvious downsides. This was at a time when my peers listened to <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Z\">Jay Z</a>, <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lox\">The Lox</a>, <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Diplomats\">Dipset</a>, &amp;c. I was almost exclusively <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Neptunes\">Neptunes</a> and Will Smith. Yes, <em>I know</em>. I was clowned for liking Big Willie&#39;s music throughout all of middle and high school.</p>\n<p>Anyhoo, if you&#39;re an aspiring radio host or anyone aspiring to do anything really, I highly recommend this book. The full title is &quot;<a href=\"http://amzn.to/2qMSdIo\" title=\"Black Privilege on Amazon\">Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It</a>&quot;. 🕸</p>\n",
418 "content_html": "<p>Charlamagne Tha God is a radio personality of a nationally syndicated show called &quot;The Breakfast Club&quot; on Power 105.1. He&#39;s not well-liked by most people, especially the people he&#39;s interviewed and has disagreements with — this is because he speaks his mind. He doesn&#39;t like your latest album? He&#39;ll tell you. Are you embroiled in controversy? He&#39;ll ask about it. Basically, he asks the questions or says the things many listeners want to ask or are thinking. I count myself as one of his fans.</p>\n<p>When Charlamagne mentioned he was writing a book, I knew I had to check it because...<strong>who the hell would give this man a book deal</strong> (<a href=\"http://www.simonandschusterpublishing.com/touchstone\" title=\"Touchstone Books\">Touchstone Books</a>, apparently)?</p>\n<p>While reading, I found myself nodding in agreement when he arrived at the conclusion of a life lesson or when he realized he had to change his thought process. I also couldn&#39;t help noticing similarities in our lives. We loved getting those Pizza Hut coupons for free personal pizzas when we read lots of books in elementary school. Music was a means of both inspiration and escape in our teens. We never finished college. Despite that, we&#39;ve been able to succeed.</p>\n<p>I was reminded that I used to live out my &quot;hood dreams&quot; vicariously through artists like <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipse\" title=\"The Clipse on Wikipedia\">Clipse</a>. While glamorizing the gangsta life, they also rapped about the obvious downsides. This was at a time when my peers listened to <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Z\">Jay Z</a>, <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lox\">The Lox</a>, <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Diplomats\">Dipset</a>, &amp;c. I was almost exclusively <a href=\"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Neptunes\">Neptunes</a> and Will Smith. Yes, <em>I know</em>. I was clowned for liking Big Willie&#39;s music throughout all of middle and high school.</p>\n<p>Anyhoo, if you&#39;re an aspiring radio host or anyone aspiring to do anything really, I highly recommend this book. The full title is &quot;<a href=\"http://amzn.to/2qMSdIo\" title=\"Black Privilege on Amazon\">Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It</a>&quot;. 🕸</p>\n",
419 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/black-privilege-review",
419 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/black-privilege-review",
420 "title": "Black Privilege review",
420 "title": "Black Privilege review",
421 "summary": "Charlamagne Tha God can write a good book. Who knew?",
421 "summary": "Charlamagne Tha God can write a good book. Who knew?",
@@ -441,7 +441,7
441 },
441 },
442 {
442 {
443 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/beachfront-digital-april-update",
443 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/beachfront-digital-april-update",
444 "content_html": "<p>Who knew analytics could be fun?</p>\n<p>I&#39;ve spent the past week and a half working on the new <a href=\"https://beachfront.digital\" title=\"Manage your domain names with Beachfront.Digital!\">BeachfrontDigital</a> and I&#39;m loving it. After publishing my <a href=\"/2017/roadmap-for-beachfront-digital\" title=\"Roadmap for BeachfrontDigital, on theWebb.blog\">previous post</a>, I thought about how I could make BD more useful to myself and other people. Something that bothered me for awhile was the lack of importing. <em>To be quite honest</em>, I was scared of the work required to make importing domains work. I just didn&#39;t want to deal with it. <strong>Lame</strong>, right?</p>\n<p>Here&#39;s a reminder of why nobody bothered to sign up for V1 of BeachfrontDigital:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>I wasn&#39;t offering anything that a spreadsheet couldn&#39;t handle.</li>\n<li>$6/year was still too much to charge for someone who has &lt;10 domains.</li>\n<li>To make charging for my service palatable, I&#39;d need to create a sync system for registrars.<ul>\n<li>Not all registrars have public APIs (see: Hover).</li>\n<li>There are <strong>so</strong> many registrars. It&#39;s not cost-effective to maintain syncing for each.</li>\n<li>Creating a sync system based on undocumented APIs like some people have done with Hover is a <em>terrible</em> idea. Undocumented APIs means they can break at <em>any</em> moment.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>This reminder was enough to get me back into making BD better, starting with CSV importing and guess what? It wasn&#39;t <strong>that</strong> bad! I think it took me two days to get importing to work, with another two for optimization. When a user decides to export their data, it&#39;ll look something like this:</p>\n<p><img src=\"/assets/images/2017/beachfront-digital-april-update-a.png\" alt=\"Snippet of my domain export from BeachfrontDigital\"/></p>\n<h3 id=\"eliminating-friction\">Eliminating friction</h3>\n<p>During a coding break, I read an article that was sitting in a tab for at least a week, <a href=\"http://firstround.com/review/amazons-friction-killing-tactics-to-make-products-more-seamless\" title=\"Amazon article on First Round Review\">Amazon&#39;s Friction-Killing Tactics To Make Products More Seamless</a>. What an eye-opener that was! The takeaway I got from it was to <em>minimize as much friction as possible for the end user</em>. It was easy to identify a major point of friction with BD as it was something I was actually dreading. Me, the guy who made the product, didn&#39;t want to perform the basic task. Why? It was too much work!</p>\n<p>In V1 of BeachfrontDigital, I had to input the domain name, registrar, price, AND expiration for every single domain I own. Even if the number of domains I had were two, that&#39;s <em>still</em> more work than I&#39;m willing to do. No one likes filling out spreadsheets, it&#39;s a chore. What to do? Automate the hell outta what we don&#39;t want to deal with!</p>\n<p>Of course, you&#39;ll have to input your domains because BD is not a mind-reading app (it <em>would be</em> in a few years if it was a Google product). Thankfully, BD will run a WHOIS search in the background and automatically grab registrar and expiration info. Pricing is something you&#39;ll have to input as well because registrars don&#39;t have the same pricing for domains/top-level domains (TLDs).</p>\n<p><img src=\"/assets/images/2017/beachfront-digital-april-update-b.jpg\" alt=\"Screenshot of my domain portfolio\"/></p>\n<p>Don&#39;t even get me started on how inconsistent TLD operators are with listing registrar names. In my testing, I found <a href=\"https://twitter.com/BeachfrontD/status/848404426557673472\" title=\"Screenshot of the hot mess that = TLD operators\">three variations</a> of the business name for Tucows. Like, why? Lucky for you, I asked customer support at both Tucows and Hover and was told this:</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>The variations in the Tucows name for different domains is simply how it was inputted at the Registry level (each domain extension or tld has a governing entity known as a Registry), and since that is a human&#39;s job normally, it gets added to their system slightly different each time.</p>\n<p>— Jordan Q</p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>In addition, domains purchased through Hover will list the registrar in WHOIS searches as Tucows. Gandi will show EPAG Domainservices GmbH, iwantmyname will show 1API GmbH, and so on. It would be <em>ideal</em> to show the actual reseller you purchased your domains from but that&#39;s not how WHOIS works. Oh well.</p>\n<h3 id=\"new-features\">New features</h3>\n<p><img src=\"/assets/images/2017/beachfront-digital-april-update-c.jpg\" alt=\"Portfolio dashboard for BeachfrontDigital\"/></p>\n<p>This is how the new portfolio dashboard looks! I figured that it&#39;d be good to show personal analytics in both textual and graphical formats. While creating this, I learned how flexible and awesome <a href=\"http://handlebarsjs.com\" title=\"Build semantic templates without frustration!\">Handlebars</a> is.</p>\n<p>At a glance, you can see how many domain renewals are occurring this month, this year, and next year. January and July are busy months for me. Interesting that they are six months apart. What is it about those months that give me ideas? I just realized I haven&#39;t accounted for people who renew domains for multiple years...<em>updates list of TODOs</em>.</p>\n<p>You can also see how many domains you own per registrar. Obviously, I favor Tucows because I like the included WHOIS privacy from Hover, for domains that support it (I don&#39;t get why <code>.fm</code> and <code>.io</code> don&#39;t, so dumb). I purchased <code>frsh.fm</code> from Gandi initially, but then moved it to Hover. Not sure why EPAG Domainservices GmbH is there...</p>\n<p>Finally, you also get to see how many domains you have per TLD. <code>.com</code> and <code>.online</code> are my favorite ones, apparently. The legend for this chart is awfully busy, I&#39;ll need to find a way to make it look better. I mean, someone with 50+ TLDs in their domain portfolio might be an edge-case, but it&#39;s going to bother me until I find a solution, haha. 🤷🏾‍♂️</p>\n<p>In order to make every data point stand out, you need color. Well, I wasn&#39;t going to manually create colors, these are all generated dynamically! I need to do a bit of tweaking here and there but I&#39;m mostly satisfied with the results.</p>\n<h3 id=\"in-conclusion\">In conclusion</h3>\n<p>At the end of my <a href=\"/2017/roadmap-for-beachfront-digital\" title=\"Roadmap for BeachfrontDigital, on theWebb.blog\">previous post</a> about BeachfrontDigital, I mentioned making the service free. Hmm, <strong>nope</strong>. However, it <em>will</em> be free during beta, which is whenever I launch V2 until I deem the service is ready for primetime. That could be as early as this summer or as late as 2018. At that point, BeachfrontDigital will cost $11/year afterwards.</p>\n<p>What you&#39;ve seen above is only half of the first wave of upgrades. My next BD post will most likely show more charts, but centered around pricing! I&#39;m also thinking about making each of the charts fullscreen-capable. It would be neat to use the left/right arrow keys to look at the other charts in fullscreen mode as well! 🕸</p>\n",
444 "content_html": "<p>Who knew analytics could be fun?</p>\n<p>I&#39;ve spent the past week and a half working on the new <a href=\"https://beachfront.digital\" title=\"Manage your domain names with Beachfront.Digital!\">BeachfrontDigital</a> and I&#39;m loving it. After publishing my <a href=\"/2017/roadmap-for-beachfront-digital\" title=\"Roadmap for BeachfrontDigital, on theWebb.blog\">previous post</a>, I thought about how I could make BD more useful to myself and other people. Something that bothered me for awhile was the lack of importing. <em>To be quite honest</em>, I was scared of the work required to make importing domains work. I just didn&#39;t want to deal with it. <strong>Lame</strong>, right?</p>\n<p>Here&#39;s a reminder of why nobody bothered to sign up for V1 of BeachfrontDigital:</p>\n<ul>\n<li>I wasn&#39;t offering anything that a spreadsheet couldn&#39;t handle.</li>\n<li>$6/year was still too much to charge for someone who has &lt;10 domains.</li>\n<li>To make charging for my service palatable, I&#39;d need to create a sync system for registrars.<ul>\n<li>Not all registrars have public APIs (see: Hover).</li>\n<li>There are <strong>so</strong> many registrars. It&#39;s not cost-effective to maintain syncing for each.</li>\n<li>Creating a sync system based on undocumented APIs like some people have done with Hover is a <em>terrible</em> idea. Undocumented APIs means they can break at <em>any</em> moment.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n</ul>\n<p>This reminder was enough to get me back into making BD better, starting with CSV importing and guess what? It wasn&#39;t <strong>that</strong> bad! I think it took me two days to get importing to work, with another two for optimization. When a user decides to export their data, it&#39;ll look something like this:</p>\n<p><img src=\"/assets/images/2017/beachfront-digital-april-update-a.png\" alt=\"Snippet of my domain export from BeachfrontDigital\"/></p>\n<h3 id=\"eliminating-friction\">Eliminating friction</h3>\n<p>During a coding break, I read an article that was sitting in a tab for at least a week, <a href=\"http://firstround.com/review/amazons-friction-killing-tactics-to-make-products-more-seamless\" title=\"Amazon article on First Round Review\">Amazon&#39;s Friction-Killing Tactics To Make Products More Seamless</a>. What an eye-opener that was! The takeaway I got from it was to <em>minimize as much friction as possible for the end user</em>. It was easy to identify a major point of friction with BD as it was something I was actually dreading. Me, the guy who made the product, didn&#39;t want to perform the basic task. Why? It was too much work!</p>\n<p>In V1 of BeachfrontDigital, I had to input the domain name, registrar, price, AND expiration for every single domain I own. Even if the number of domains I had were two, that&#39;s <em>still</em> more work than I&#39;m willing to do. No one likes filling out spreadsheets, it&#39;s a chore. What to do? Automate the hell outta what we don&#39;t want to deal with!</p>\n<p>Of course, you&#39;ll have to input your domains because BD is not a mind-reading app (it <em>would be</em> in a few years if it was a Google product). Thankfully, BD will run a WHOIS search in the background and automatically grab registrar and expiration info. Pricing is something you&#39;ll have to input as well because registrars don&#39;t have the same pricing for domains/top-level domains (TLDs).</p>\n<p><img src=\"/assets/images/2017/beachfront-digital-april-update-b.jpg\" alt=\"Screenshot of my domain portfolio\"/></p>\n<p>Don&#39;t even get me started on how inconsistent TLD operators are with listing registrar names. In my testing, I found <a href=\"https://twitter.com/BeachfrontD/status/848404426557673472\" title=\"Screenshot of the hot mess that = TLD operators\">three variations</a> of the business name for Tucows. Like, why? Lucky for you, I asked customer support at both Tucows and Hover and was told this:</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>The variations in the Tucows name for different domains is simply how it was inputted at the Registry level (each domain extension or tld has a governing entity known as a Registry), and since that is a human&#39;s job normally, it gets added to their system slightly different each time.</p>\n<p>— Jordan Q</p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>In addition, domains purchased through Hover will list the registrar in WHOIS searches as Tucows. Gandi will show EPAG Domainservices GmbH, iwantmyname will show 1API GmbH, and so on. It would be <em>ideal</em> to show the actual reseller you purchased your domains from but that&#39;s not how WHOIS works. Oh well.</p>\n<h3 id=\"new-features\">New features</h3>\n<p><img src=\"/assets/images/2017/beachfront-digital-april-update-c.jpg\" alt=\"Portfolio dashboard for BeachfrontDigital\"/></p>\n<p>This is how the new portfolio dashboard looks! I figured that it&#39;d be good to show personal analytics in both textual and graphical formats. While creating this, I learned how flexible and awesome <a href=\"http://handlebarsjs.com\" title=\"Build semantic templates without frustration!\">Handlebars</a> is.</p>\n<p>At a glance, you can see how many domain renewals are occurring this month, this year, and next year. January and July are busy months for me. Interesting that they are six months apart. What is it about those months that give me ideas? I just realized I haven&#39;t accounted for people who renew domains for multiple years...<em>updates list of TODOs</em>.</p>\n<p>You can also see how many domains you own per registrar. Obviously, I favor Tucows because I like the included WHOIS privacy from Hover, for domains that support it (I don&#39;t get why <code>.fm</code> and <code>.io</code> don&#39;t, so dumb). I purchased <code>frsh.fm</code> from Gandi initially, but then moved it to Hover. Not sure why EPAG Domainservices GmbH is there...</p>\n<p>Finally, you also get to see how many domains you have per TLD. <code>.com</code> and <code>.online</code> are my favorite ones, apparently. The legend for this chart is awfully busy, I&#39;ll need to find a way to make it look better. I mean, someone with 50+ TLDs in their domain portfolio might be an edge-case, but it&#39;s going to bother me until I find a solution, haha. 🤷🏾‍♂️</p>\n<p>In order to make every data point stand out, you need color. Well, I wasn&#39;t going to manually create colors, these are all generated dynamically! I need to do a bit of tweaking here and there but I&#39;m mostly satisfied with the results.</p>\n<h3 id=\"in-conclusion\">In conclusion</h3>\n<p>At the end of my <a href=\"/2017/roadmap-for-beachfront-digital\" title=\"Roadmap for BeachfrontDigital, on theWebb.blog\">previous post</a> about BeachfrontDigital, I mentioned making the service free. Hmm, <strong>nope</strong>. However, it <em>will</em> be free during beta, which is whenever I launch V2 until I deem the service is ready for primetime. That could be as early as this summer or as late as 2018. At that point, BeachfrontDigital will cost $11/year afterwards.</p>\n<p>What you&#39;ve seen above is only half of the first wave of upgrades. My next BD post will most likely show more charts, but centered around pricing! I&#39;m also thinking about making each of the charts fullscreen-capable. It would be neat to use the left/right arrow keys to look at the other charts in fullscreen mode as well! 🕸</p>\n",
445 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/beachfront-digital-april-update",
445 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/beachfront-digital-april-update",
446 "title": "BeachfrontDigital — April Update",
446 "title": "BeachfrontDigital — April Update",
447 "summary": "Eliminating friction and adding new features to BeachfrontDigital.",
447 "summary": "Eliminating friction and adding new features to BeachfrontDigital.",
@@ -493,7 +493,7
493 },
493 },
494 {
494 {
495 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/the-swedish-life",
495 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/the-swedish-life",
496 "content_html": "<p>I recently read an <a href=\"https://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/sweden-six-hour-working-day-too-expensive-scrapped-experiment-cothenburg-pilot-scheme-a7508581.html\" title=\"Link to an article by The Independent\">article</a> about Sweden&#39;s six-hour work day and was fascinated by it because here in the States, it&#39;s more about the <em>quantity</em> of hours you put in, it&#39;s not about the <em>quality</em> of the work you put in (FWIW, that seems to be changing in start-up land). Henry Ford famously tested the eight-hour work day with his factory employees, but it&#39;s 2017 now. Do we <em>really</em> need to continue the trend?</p>\n<p>To <a href=\"https://brath.com/why-we-started-with-6-hour-work-days\" title=\"Link to an article by Brath\">quote</a> Magnus Bråth of Brath, a tech company in Sweden (emphasis mine):</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>We also believe that once you&#39;ve gotten used to having time for the family, picking up the kids at day care, spending time training for a race or simply just cooking good food at home, you don&#39;t want to lose that again. We believe that this is a good reason to stay with us and not only because of the actual impact longer hours would make in your life but for the reason behind our shorter days. That we have shorter days is not the main reason people stay with us, they are the symptom of the reason. The reason is that we actually care about our employees, <strong>we care enough to prioritize their time with the family, cooking or doing something else they love doing</strong>.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<blockquote>\n<p>A third huge reason for shorter days is that we all feel more rested. Obviously we too have to stay late at times, obviously we too are stressed at times but it&#39;s from a better base line. Working late at our two offices often mean staying for 8 hours, or 7. <strong>Think about it, when mom comes home late, she comes home at 5.</strong></p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>In the linked article at the top of this post, the six-hour work day experiment ended because it was too expensive for the nursing home it was tested in. Nurses were more alert and as a result, <strong>care and happiness amongst those being cared for increased</strong> drastically. <em>However</em>, more nurses were hired to provide overlap for shifts. As countries become more wealthy, I think the benefits will outweigh the costs.</p>\n<p>I look forward to implementing a similar system when I am able to hire people for <a href=\"https://the-inc.co\" title=\"Link to !NC\">Ideas Never Cease</a>. Better maternity / paternity / grief leave as well! A previous employer didn&#39;t seem to give a damn while I was grieving over my miscarried daughter Zoe Elise and that added to the hurt, immensely. I don&#39;t <em>ever</em> want to make someone else feel the way I felt, it sucked. My grief was getting in the way of your <strong>false deadline</strong> on a project for your <strong>still breathing</strong> family member? Whoops, <em>my bad</em>. 🙄 But I digress.</p>\n<p>Chantal Panozzo wrote a <a href=\"https://www.vox.com/2015/7/21/8974435/switzerland-work-life-balance\" title=\"Link to an article for Vox\">great article for Vox</a> detailing her life in Switzerland and the amazing adjustment from American work life. Here are a few choice quotes:</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>In Switzerland, you don&#39;t arrive to a meeting late, but you also don&#39;t leave for your lunch break a second past noon. If it&#39;s summer, jumping into the lake to swim with the swans is an acceptable way to spend your lunch hour. If you eat a sandwich at your desk, people will scold you.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<blockquote>\n<p>Lunchtime is sacred time in Switzerland. When I was on maternity leave, my husband came home for lunch to help me care for our daughter. This strengthened our marriage. Many families still reunite during weekdays over the lunch hour.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<blockquote>\n<p>Swiss law mandates a 14-week maternity leave at a minimum of 80 percent pay.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<blockquote>\n<p>People in Europe took vacation seriously. Once, when I only took 10 days for a trip to Spain, my colleagues chastised me for taking so little time off. I learned to take vacation chunks in two-week intervals. Well rested, I noticed that I felt more productive and creative when I returned to work. Recent <a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/opinion/sunday/relax-youll-be-more-productive.html?pagewanted=all&amp;_r=1&amp;&amp;gwh=AC034D10F64239B961A6E1CDE12C9332&amp;gwt=pay&amp;assetType=opinion\" title=\"Link to an article by the New York Times\">American research</a> confirms what I was feeling: Relaxing can make you <a href=\"http://www.vox.com/2014/7/22/5912369/creativity-vacation-work-office\" title=\"Link to an article by Vox\">more productive</a>.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>I could continue, but you get the gist.</p>\n<p>With self-imposed deadlines, I find that I am more creative in my problem-solving and often find better solutions than if I was working on problems without a time-sensitive goal attached. I believe the same thing would be applied to a shorter work day. A six-hour work day would also discourage long meetings without focus (well, long meetings <em>period</em>). I don&#39;t see big American companies making these quote drastic changes but startups? Hell yeah, definitely. Instead of focusing on &quot;perks&quot; like beer on tap, foosball tables, and game systems, &amp;c, why not focus on improving the lives of your employees so they can make dope shit?</p>\n<p>Happy employees will reward you with their absolute best work. Simple. 🕸</p>\n",
496 "content_html": "<p>I recently read an <a href=\"https://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/sweden-six-hour-working-day-too-expensive-scrapped-experiment-cothenburg-pilot-scheme-a7508581.html\" title=\"Link to an article by The Independent\">article</a> about Sweden&#39;s six-hour work day and was fascinated by it because here in the States, it&#39;s more about the <em>quantity</em> of hours you put in, it&#39;s not about the <em>quality</em> of the work you put in (FWIW, that seems to be changing in start-up land). Henry Ford famously tested the eight-hour work day with his factory employees, but it&#39;s 2017 now. Do we <em>really</em> need to continue the trend?</p>\n<p>To <a href=\"https://brath.com/why-we-started-with-6-hour-work-days\" title=\"Link to an article by Brath\">quote</a> Magnus Bråth of Brath, a tech company in Sweden (emphasis mine):</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>We also believe that once you&#39;ve gotten used to having time for the family, picking up the kids at day care, spending time training for a race or simply just cooking good food at home, you don&#39;t want to lose that again. We believe that this is a good reason to stay with us and not only because of the actual impact longer hours would make in your life but for the reason behind our shorter days. That we have shorter days is not the main reason people stay with us, they are the symptom of the reason. The reason is that we actually care about our employees, <strong>we care enough to prioritize their time with the family, cooking or doing something else they love doing</strong>.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<blockquote>\n<p>A third huge reason for shorter days is that we all feel more rested. Obviously we too have to stay late at times, obviously we too are stressed at times but it&#39;s from a better base line. Working late at our two offices often mean staying for 8 hours, or 7. <strong>Think about it, when mom comes home late, she comes home at 5.</strong></p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>In the linked article at the top of this post, the six-hour work day experiment ended because it was too expensive for the nursing home it was tested in. Nurses were more alert and as a result, <strong>care and happiness amongst those being cared for increased</strong> drastically. <em>However</em>, more nurses were hired to provide overlap for shifts. As countries become more wealthy, I think the benefits will outweigh the costs.</p>\n<p>I look forward to implementing a similar system when I am able to hire people for <a href=\"https://the-inc.co\" title=\"Link to !NC\">Ideas Never Cease</a>. Better maternity / paternity / grief leave as well! A previous employer didn&#39;t seem to give a damn while I was grieving over my miscarried daughter Zoe Elise and that added to the hurt, immensely. I don&#39;t <em>ever</em> want to make someone else feel the way I felt, it sucked. My grief was getting in the way of your <strong>false deadline</strong> on a project for your <strong>still breathing</strong> family member? Whoops, <em>my bad</em>. 🙄 But I digress.</p>\n<p>Chantal Panozzo wrote a <a href=\"https://www.vox.com/2015/7/21/8974435/switzerland-work-life-balance\" title=\"Link to an article for Vox\">great article for Vox</a> detailing her life in Switzerland and the amazing adjustment from American work life. Here are a few choice quotes:</p>\n<blockquote>\n<p>In Switzerland, you don&#39;t arrive to a meeting late, but you also don&#39;t leave for your lunch break a second past noon. If it&#39;s summer, jumping into the lake to swim with the swans is an acceptable way to spend your lunch hour. If you eat a sandwich at your desk, people will scold you.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<blockquote>\n<p>Lunchtime is sacred time in Switzerland. When I was on maternity leave, my husband came home for lunch to help me care for our daughter. This strengthened our marriage. Many families still reunite during weekdays over the lunch hour.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<blockquote>\n<p>Swiss law mandates a 14-week maternity leave at a minimum of 80 percent pay.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<blockquote>\n<p>People in Europe took vacation seriously. Once, when I only took 10 days for a trip to Spain, my colleagues chastised me for taking so little time off. I learned to take vacation chunks in two-week intervals. Well rested, I noticed that I felt more productive and creative when I returned to work. Recent <a href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/opinion/sunday/relax-youll-be-more-productive.html?pagewanted=all&amp;_r=1&amp;&amp;gwh=AC034D10F64239B961A6E1CDE12C9332&amp;gwt=pay&amp;assetType=opinion\" title=\"Link to an article by the New York Times\">American research</a> confirms what I was feeling: Relaxing can make you <a href=\"http://www.vox.com/2014/7/22/5912369/creativity-vacation-work-office\" title=\"Link to an article by Vox\">more productive</a>.</p>\n</blockquote>\n<p>I could continue, but you get the gist.</p>\n<p>With self-imposed deadlines, I find that I am more creative in my problem-solving and often find better solutions than if I was working on problems without a time-sensitive goal attached. I believe the same thing would be applied to a shorter work day. A six-hour work day would also discourage long meetings without focus (well, long meetings <em>period</em>). I don&#39;t see big American companies making these quote drastic changes but startups? Hell yeah, definitely. Instead of focusing on &quot;perks&quot; like beer on tap, foosball tables, and game systems, &amp;c, why not focus on improving the lives of your employees so they can make dope shit?</p>\n<p>Happy employees will reward you with their absolute best work. Simple. 🕸</p>\n",
497 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/the-swedish-life",
497 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/the-swedish-life",
498 "title": "The appeal of the Swiss and Swedish work life",
498 "title": "The appeal of the Swiss and Swedish work life",
499 "summary": "Living to work versus working to live.",
499 "summary": "Living to work versus working to live.",
@@ -519,7 +519,7
519 },
519 },
520 {
520 {
521 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/books-i-plan-to-read-this-year",
521 "id": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/books-i-plan-to-read-this-year",
522 "content_html": "<p>My girlfriend and I are in competition to see who can read the most books this year. Before going through my list, let&#39;s have a look at my bookshelf.</p>\n<p><img src=\"/assets/images/2017/books-i-plan-to-read-this-year-a.jpg\" alt=\"My bookshelf has more than books on it\"/></p>\n<p>As you can see, I have a <strong>lot</strong> going on. Eagle-eyed observers will see that some books have red dot stickers on them. Those are there to symbolize which books I have not read yet, or <em>started</em> but haven&#39;t finished. In alphabetical order, they are:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><del><em>1984</em> — George Orwell</del> <a href=\"/2017/1984-review\">review</a></li>\n<li><em>The 48 Laws of Power</em> — Robert Greene</li>\n<li><em>A Culture of Innovation: Insider accounts of computing and life at BBN</em> — David Walden and Raymond Nickerson</li>\n<li><em>The Art of Profitability</em> — Adrian Slywotzky</li>\n<li><em>The Art of the Start</em> — Guy Kawasaki</li>\n<li><em>Astronomy 101</em> — Carolyn Collins Petersen</li>\n<li><em>Brave New World</em> — Aldous Huxley</li>\n<li><em>Bring the Outdoors In</em> — Shane Powers and Gentl &amp; Hyers</li>\n<li><em>Business Model Generation</em> — Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur</li>\n<li><em>The Cold Between</em> — Elizabeth Bonesteel</li>\n<li><em>Connectography</em> — Parag Khanna</li>\n<li><em>Cosmos</em> — Carl Sagan</li>\n<li><del><em>Count Zero</em> — William Gibson</del> <a href=\"/2017/count-zero-review\">review</a></li>\n<li><em>Designing News</em> — Francesco Franchi</li>\n<li><em>Easy Origami</em> — John Montroll</li>\n<li><em>The Fabric of the Cosmos</em> — Brian Greene</li>\n<li><em>Getting Things Done</em> — David Allen</li>\n<li><em>HOLO 2</em> — Various Artists/Writers</li>\n<li><em>Humans Of New York stories</em> — Brandon Stanton</li>\n<li><em>Illuminations: Wisdom From This Planet&#39;s Greatest Minds</em> — Illuminatiam</li>\n<li><em>Isaac Newton&#39;s Principia Mathematica Reissue</em> — Kronecker Wallis</li>\n<li><em>The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047</em> — Lionel Shriver</li>\n<li><em>The Mission Chinese Food Cookbook</em> — Danny Bowien and Chris Ying</li>\n<li><em>Mona Lisa Overdrive</em> — William Gibson</li>\n<li><em>NASA Graphic Standards Manual reissue</em> — Jesse Reed &amp; Hamish Smyth</li>\n<li><em>The Nature of Code</em> — Daniel Shiffman</li>\n<li><em>NES/Famicom: a visual compendium</em> — Sam Dyer</li>\n<li><em>NLP: The New Technology of Achievement</em> — NLP Comprehensive and Steve Andreas</li>\n<li><em>Operating Systems: Design and Implementation</em> — Andrew S Tanenbaum and Albert S Woodhull</li>\n<li><em>A People&#39;s History of the United States</em> — Howard Zinn</li>\n<li><em>Physics of the Future</em> — Michio Kaku</li>\n<li><em>Rayla 2212</em> — Ytasha L Womack</li>\n<li><em>The Remnants of Trust</em> — Elizabeth Bonesteel</li>\n<li><em>The Secret Recipes</em> — Dominique Ansel</li>\n<li><em>Selling the Invisible</em> — Harry Beckwith</li>\n<li><em>Snowcrash</em> — Neal Stephenson</li>\n<li><em>Space Chronicles</em> — Neil deGrasse Tyson</li>\n<li><em>Universal Principles of Design</em> — William Lidwell and Kritina Holden</li>\n</ul>\n<p>That&#39;s 38 books in total. Of those, two of them aren&#39;t actually in my possession <em>yet</em>. <em>Isaac Newton&#39;s Principia Mathematica Reissue</em> and <em>NES/Famicom: a visual compendium</em> are both Kickstarter-backed books that should be delivered sometime this year.</p>\n<p>To hold myself accountable <strong>and</strong> make sure I retain the information I read, I&#39;m going to do book reports on this blog which will basically be reviews. My girlfriend is going to do the same thing on <a href=\"http://sincerelyshantelle.com\" title=\"My girlfriend&#39;s blog, &ldquo;Sincerely Shantelle&rdquo;\">her blog</a>, so be sure to check that out.</p>\n<p>I am most excited to read <em>Count Zero</em> and <em>Mona Lisa Overdrive</em> because I absolutely <strong>love</strong> <em>Neuromancer</em> (all three of these books were written by William Gibson). I&#39;ve read it a few times already. Funny story, while still in high school I visited a Border&#39;s bookstore (RIP) to buy Neuromancer. The store clerk thought I said &quot;New Romancer&quot; and wasted 10 minutes trying to find the incorrect book. In hindsight, I&#39;m surprised that wasn&#39;t a real book in the store.</p>\n<p>Anyhoo, the book I am reading right now is <em>A Culture of Innovation: Insider accounts of computing and life at BBN</em>. I am <strong>fascinated</strong> about the beginnings of the Internet. To think that it didn&#39;t always exist and now it&#39;s in the very fabric of our lives thanks in part to the people at <em>Bolt Beranek and Newman</em> is so cool to me. 🕸</p>\n",
522 "content_html": "<p>My girlfriend and I are in competition to see who can read the most books this year. Before going through my list, let&#39;s have a look at my bookshelf.</p>\n<p><img src=\"/assets/images/2017/books-i-plan-to-read-this-year-a.jpg\" alt=\"My bookshelf has more than books on it\"/></p>\n<p>As you can see, I have a <strong>lot</strong> going on. Eagle-eyed observers will see that some books have red dot stickers on them. Those are there to symbolize which books I have not read yet, or <em>started</em> but haven&#39;t finished. In alphabetical order, they are:</p>\n<ul>\n<li><del><em>1984</em> — George Orwell</del> <a href=\"/2017/1984-review\">review</a></li>\n<li><em>The 48 Laws of Power</em> — Robert Greene</li>\n<li><em>A Culture of Innovation: Insider accounts of computing and life at BBN</em> — David Walden and Raymond Nickerson</li>\n<li><em>The Art of Profitability</em> — Adrian Slywotzky</li>\n<li><em>The Art of the Start</em> — Guy Kawasaki</li>\n<li><em>Astronomy 101</em> — Carolyn Collins Petersen</li>\n<li><em>Brave New World</em> — Aldous Huxley</li>\n<li><em>Bring the Outdoors In</em> — Shane Powers and Gentl &amp; Hyers</li>\n<li><em>Business Model Generation</em> — Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur</li>\n<li><em>The Cold Between</em> — Elizabeth Bonesteel</li>\n<li><em>Connectography</em> — Parag Khanna</li>\n<li><em>Cosmos</em> — Carl Sagan</li>\n<li><del><em>Count Zero</em> — William Gibson</del> <a href=\"/2017/count-zero-review\">review</a></li>\n<li><em>Designing News</em> — Francesco Franchi</li>\n<li><em>Easy Origami</em> — John Montroll</li>\n<li><em>The Fabric of the Cosmos</em> — Brian Greene</li>\n<li><em>Getting Things Done</em> — David Allen</li>\n<li><em>HOLO 2</em> — Various Artists/Writers</li>\n<li><em>Humans Of New York stories</em> — Brandon Stanton</li>\n<li><em>Illuminations: Wisdom From This Planet&#39;s Greatest Minds</em> — Illuminatiam</li>\n<li><em>Isaac Newton&#39;s Principia Mathematica Reissue</em> — Kronecker Wallis</li>\n<li><em>The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047</em> — Lionel Shriver</li>\n<li><em>The Mission Chinese Food Cookbook</em> — Danny Bowien and Chris Ying</li>\n<li><em>Mona Lisa Overdrive</em> — William Gibson</li>\n<li><em>NASA Graphic Standards Manual reissue</em> — Jesse Reed &amp; Hamish Smyth</li>\n<li><em>The Nature of Code</em> — Daniel Shiffman</li>\n<li><em>NES/Famicom: a visual compendium</em> — Sam Dyer</li>\n<li><em>NLP: The New Technology of Achievement</em> — NLP Comprehensive and Steve Andreas</li>\n<li><em>Operating Systems: Design and Implementation</em> — Andrew S Tanenbaum and Albert S Woodhull</li>\n<li><em>A People&#39;s History of the United States</em> — Howard Zinn</li>\n<li><em>Physics of the Future</em> — Michio Kaku</li>\n<li><em>Rayla 2212</em> — Ytasha L Womack</li>\n<li><em>The Remnants of Trust</em> — Elizabeth Bonesteel</li>\n<li><em>The Secret Recipes</em> — Dominique Ansel</li>\n<li><em>Selling the Invisible</em> — Harry Beckwith</li>\n<li><em>Snowcrash</em> — Neal Stephenson</li>\n<li><em>Space Chronicles</em> — Neil deGrasse Tyson</li>\n<li><em>Universal Principles of Design</em> — William Lidwell and Kritina Holden</li>\n</ul>\n<p>That&#39;s 38 books in total. Of those, two of them aren&#39;t actually in my possession <em>yet</em>. <em>Isaac Newton&#39;s Principia Mathematica Reissue</em> and <em>NES/Famicom: a visual compendium</em> are both Kickstarter-backed books that should be delivered sometime this year.</p>\n<p>To hold myself accountable <strong>and</strong> make sure I retain the information I read, I&#39;m going to do book reports on this blog which will basically be reviews. My girlfriend is going to do the same thing on <a href=\"http://sincerelyshantelle.com\" title=\"My girlfriend&#39;s blog, &ldquo;Sincerely Shantelle&rdquo;\">her blog</a>, so be sure to check that out.</p>\n<p>I am most excited to read <em>Count Zero</em> and <em>Mona Lisa Overdrive</em> because I absolutely <strong>love</strong> <em>Neuromancer</em> (all three of these books were written by William Gibson). I&#39;ve read it a few times already. Funny story, while still in high school I visited a Border&#39;s bookstore (RIP) to buy Neuromancer. The store clerk thought I said &quot;New Romancer&quot; and wasted 10 minutes trying to find the incorrect book. In hindsight, I&#39;m surprised that wasn&#39;t a real book in the store.</p>\n<p>Anyhoo, the book I am reading right now is <em>A Culture of Innovation: Insider accounts of computing and life at BBN</em>. I am <strong>fascinated</strong> about the beginnings of the Internet. To think that it didn&#39;t always exist and now it&#39;s in the very fabric of our lives thanks in part to the people at <em>Bolt Beranek and Newman</em> is so cool to me. 🕸</p>\n",
523 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/books-i-plan-to-read-this-year",
523 "url": "https://blog.webb.page/2017/books-i-plan-to-read-this-year",
524 "title": "Books I plan to read this year",
524 "title": "Books I plan to read this year",
525 "summary": "Setting myself up for failure by making a public promise to read a long-ass list of books.",
525 "summary": "Setting myself up for failure by making a public promise to read a long-ass list of books.",
@@ -60,7 +60,7 Because the Internet is open to all, there will inevitably be disturbing/disgust
60
60
61 ## Prior Art
61 ## Prior Art
62
62
63 There's a company named Urbit who's mission is quite similar:
63 There's a company named Urbit whose mission is quite similar:
64
64
65 > An Urbit is a networked personal server that runs your apps and stores your data, serves as your permanent online identity and puts you back in control of your digital life under a single login.
65 > An Urbit is a networked personal server that runs your apps and stores your data, serves as your permanent online identity and puts you back in control of your digital life under a single login.
66 >
66 >
@@ -19,7 +19,7
19 "fastify-helmet": "^3.0.2",
19 "fastify-helmet": "^3.0.2",
20 "fastify-static": "^2.5.1",
20 "fastify-static": "^2.5.1",
21 "feed": "^4.0.0",
21 "feed": "^4.0.0",
22 "marked": "^0.7.0"
22 "marked": "^0.8.0"
23 },
23 },
24 "description": "Blog of Paul Anthony Webb",
24 "description": "Blog of Paul Anthony Webb",
25 "devDependencies": {
25 "devDependencies": {
@@ -51,7 +51,7
51 "husky": "^3.1.0",
51 "husky": "^3.1.0",
52 "js-yaml": "^3.13.1",
52 "js-yaml": "^3.13.1",
53 "link-module-alias": "^1.2.0",
53 "link-module-alias": "^1.2.0",
54 "nodemon": "^2.0.1",
54 "nodemon": "^2.0.2",
55 "npm-run-all": "^4.1.5",
55 "npm-run-all": "^4.1.5",
56 "pino-pretty": "^3.5.0",
56 "pino-pretty": "^3.5.0",
57 "recursive-readdir": "^2.2.2",
57 "recursive-readdir": "^2.2.2",
@@ -98,5 +98,5
98 "app/dist"
98 "app/dist"
99 ]
99 ]
100 },
100 },
101 "version": "2019.12.08.1"
101 "version": "2019.12.12"
102 }
102 }
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